Thanks to Open Society, we live in peculiar times

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On one hand, George Soros—funded groups CREW  and CAP played a key part in the Foley brouhaha, in which the claim is that Republicans were not doing enough to protect pages who are not minors. But Soros also funds the ACLU through the same Open Society organization that funds CREW and CAP.

And here is last week's big ACLU win:

U.S. District Court in Indianapolis has ruled an ordinance that banned sex offenders from coming near many sites where children are present is unconstitutional. This has been confirmed to 24—Hour News 8 by the Indiana Civil Liberties Union.

Six men convicted of sex offenses against children sued the city of Indianapolis to overturn the ordinance that bans them from being within one—thousand feet of parks, pools, playgrounds and other sites when children are present.

The six are represented by the American Civil Liberties Union of Indiana. They argued that the ordinance makes it virtually impossible for them to travel through Marion County without crossing into one of the forbidden areas, which are not marked.

The original ordinance cleared the City—County Council by a 25—to—2 vote on May 15th, 2006 and took effect immediately.

Clarice Feldman   10 08 06

On one hand, George Soros—funded groups CREW  and CAP played a key part in the Foley brouhaha, in which the claim is that Republicans were not doing enough to protect pages who are not minors. But Soros also funds the ACLU through the same Open Society organization that funds CREW and CAP.

And here is last week's big ACLU win:

U.S. District Court in Indianapolis has ruled an ordinance that banned sex offenders from coming near many sites where children are present is unconstitutional. This has been confirmed to 24—Hour News 8 by the Indiana Civil Liberties Union.

Six men convicted of sex offenses against children sued the city of Indianapolis to overturn the ordinance that bans them from being within one—thousand feet of parks, pools, playgrounds and other sites when children are present.

The six are represented by the American Civil Liberties Union of Indiana. They argued that the ordinance makes it virtually impossible for them to travel through Marion County without crossing into one of the forbidden areas, which are not marked.

The original ordinance cleared the City—County Council by a 25—to—2 vote on May 15th, 2006 and took effect immediately.

Clarice Feldman   10 08 06