Kerry, Kennedy and Rockefeller:Advisors to our Enemies

We know that Senator Kerry while still a reserve officer, negotiated with the enemy during the Viet Nam War and that Senator Rockefeller traveled to Syria before the war in Iraq to tip off our enemies about our battle plans.
 
Now we know that Senator Kennedy  offered help to the Soviets. Quote:

In his book, which came out this week, Kengor focuses on a KGB letter written at the height of the Cold War that shows that Sen. Edward Kennedy (D—Mass.) offered to assist Soviet leaders in formulating a public relations strategy to counter President Reagan's foreign policy and to complicate his re—election efforts.

The letter, dated May 14, 1983, was sent from the head of the KGB to Yuri Andropov, who was then General Secretary of the Soviet Union's Communist Party.

In his letter, KGB head Viktor Chebrikov offered Andropov his interpretation of Kennedy's offer. Former U.S. Sen. John Tunney (D—Calif.) had traveled to Moscow on behalf of Kennedy to seek out a partnership with Andropov and other Soviet officials, Kengor claims in his book.

At one point after President Reagan left office, Tunney acknowledged that he had played the role of intermediary, not only for Kennedy but for other U.S. senators, Kengor said. Moreover, Tunney told the London Times that he had made 15 separate trips to Moscow.

The revelation adds new meaning to the term opposition party.

Clarice Feldman   10 20 06

We know that Senator Kerry while still a reserve officer, negotiated with the enemy during the Viet Nam War and that Senator Rockefeller traveled to Syria before the war in Iraq to tip off our enemies about our battle plans.
 
Now we know that Senator Kennedy  offered help to the Soviets. Quote:

In his book, which came out this week, Kengor focuses on a KGB letter written at the height of the Cold War that shows that Sen. Edward Kennedy (D—Mass.) offered to assist Soviet leaders in formulating a public relations strategy to counter President Reagan's foreign policy and to complicate his re—election efforts.

The letter, dated May 14, 1983, was sent from the head of the KGB to Yuri Andropov, who was then General Secretary of the Soviet Union's Communist Party.

In his letter, KGB head Viktor Chebrikov offered Andropov his interpretation of Kennedy's offer. Former U.S. Sen. John Tunney (D—Calif.) had traveled to Moscow on behalf of Kennedy to seek out a partnership with Andropov and other Soviet officials, Kengor claims in his book.

At one point after President Reagan left office, Tunney acknowledged that he had played the role of intermediary, not only for Kennedy but for other U.S. senators, Kengor said. Moreover, Tunney told the London Times that he had made 15 separate trips to Moscow.

The revelation adds new meaning to the term opposition party.

Clarice Feldman   10 20 06