Illinois governor keeps illicit contributions

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The Chicago Tribune reports,

Gov. Rod Blagojevich said Wednesday that he would not return campaign contributions raised by an Arab—American organization even though an internal investigation determined the state employee who heads the group organized a Blagojevich fundraiser on state time.

The governor's executive inspector general recommended firing Khalil Shalabi for allegedly conducting personal and political business while on the job at the Tinley Park Mental Health Center, according to a report obtained by the Tribune. As part of Shalabi's activities, he used state resources to solicit contributions for Blagojevich's campaign committee, organizing a Sept. 12 "Governor's Reception" fundraising dinner, according to the report.

Speaking to reporters after attending a closed business forum in Chicago with Republican rival Judy Baar Topinka, Blagojevich said he wasn't going to give the money back.

"Because one individual's wrongful action, that individual needs to be held responsible for his or her wrongful actions," the governor said, declining to answer any more questions on the matter.

The fruit of a poisonous tree is still poisonous, Governor.

The Chicago Tribune reports,

Gov. Rod Blagojevich said Wednesday that he would not return campaign contributions raised by an Arab—American organization even though an internal investigation determined the state employee who heads the group organized a Blagojevich fundraiser on state time.

The governor's executive inspector general recommended firing Khalil Shalabi for allegedly conducting personal and political business while on the job at the Tinley Park Mental Health Center, according to a report obtained by the Tribune. As part of Shalabi's activities, he used state resources to solicit contributions for Blagojevich's campaign committee, organizing a Sept. 12 "Governor's Reception" fundraising dinner, according to the report.

Speaking to reporters after attending a closed business forum in Chicago with Republican rival Judy Baar Topinka, Blagojevich said he wasn't going to give the money back.

"Because one individual's wrongful action, that individual needs to be held responsible for his or her wrongful actions," the governor said, declining to answer any more questions on the matter.

The fruit of a poisonous tree is still poisonous, Governor.