If the peace groups really wanted to make a difference

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A reader makes an excellent point. Instead of attacking Bush and failing to support Bolton the Save Darfur (by backing all the wrong institutions and players, I might add) group might better put their attention to  exposing those who are supplying those who are slaughtering the innocents.

I'm going to help them figure out where to focus their attention by repeating his fine research for them... if only they'd  take time from stapling their anti—Bush placards to do something rational:

1. 'Globally, small arms ammunition exports represent about a third of the overall value of authorized transfers of small arms and light weapons. Ammunition reaches criminal settings and embargoed countries through trafficking, which often builds on legal loopholes of authorized transfers processes.' 

This website is extensive.

2. 'The report indicated that military planes and helicopters used to bomb villages and support ground attacks on civilians were sold to Sudan by companies in Russia, China and Belarus.

Small arms and light weapons are exported to Sudan mainly from China, France, Iran and Saudi Arabia.

France is cited as the largest exporter of bombs, grenades and ammunition. Between 2000 and 2001, it exported military items worth US $268,612.

China supplied parts and accessories for shotguns, pistols and revolvers worth US$978,172, while Saudi Arabia exported military weapons worth US$58,329.'

3. 'France led opposition to US moves at the UN over Iraq. As was the case in Iraq, France also has significant oil interests in Sudan.'

4. 'The conflict in Darfur has been fueled by arms shipments arranged by international brokers over the past decade and a half. Dealers in China, Russia and France are the largest perpetrators of these unscrupulous arms sales.'

5. The case of Sudan

'...Principal exporters of small arms to Sudan appear to be Iran, China, France, Saudi Arabia, Switzerland, and the UK[23] (this tally excludes further volumes of arms sales in terms of fighter jets, helicopters, etc.). The fact that UN Security Council nations have stakes in the illegal arms supply of the Janjawid/Sudanese government genocide in Darfur (and China's strong oil—supply relationship with the Sudanese government) helps explain the Security Council's failure to act to stop the war.'

Clarice Feldman   10 03 06

A reader makes an excellent point. Instead of attacking Bush and failing to support Bolton the Save Darfur (by backing all the wrong institutions and players, I might add) group might better put their attention to  exposing those who are supplying those who are slaughtering the innocents.

I'm going to help them figure out where to focus their attention by repeating his fine research for them... if only they'd  take time from stapling their anti—Bush placards to do something rational:

1. 'Globally, small arms ammunition exports represent about a third of the overall value of authorized transfers of small arms and light weapons. Ammunition reaches criminal settings and embargoed countries through trafficking, which often builds on legal loopholes of authorized transfers processes.' 

This website is extensive.

2. 'The report indicated that military planes and helicopters used to bomb villages and support ground attacks on civilians were sold to Sudan by companies in Russia, China and Belarus.

Small arms and light weapons are exported to Sudan mainly from China, France, Iran and Saudi Arabia.

France is cited as the largest exporter of bombs, grenades and ammunition. Between 2000 and 2001, it exported military items worth US $268,612.

China supplied parts and accessories for shotguns, pistols and revolvers worth US$978,172, while Saudi Arabia exported military weapons worth US$58,329.'

3. 'France led opposition to US moves at the UN over Iraq. As was the case in Iraq, France also has significant oil interests in Sudan.'

4. 'The conflict in Darfur has been fueled by arms shipments arranged by international brokers over the past decade and a half. Dealers in China, Russia and France are the largest perpetrators of these unscrupulous arms sales.'

5. The case of Sudan

'...Principal exporters of small arms to Sudan appear to be Iran, China, France, Saudi Arabia, Switzerland, and the UK[23] (this tally excludes further volumes of arms sales in terms of fighter jets, helicopters, etc.). The fact that UN Security Council nations have stakes in the illegal arms supply of the Janjawid/Sudanese government genocide in Darfur (and China's strong oil—supply relationship with the Sudanese government) helps explain the Security Council's failure to act to stop the war.'

Clarice Feldman   10 03 06