Arnold

By

It is almost two years to the day since I last saw Red. It was October 29th 2004, one day after the Sox had clinched the World Series. Red was appearing at a local Chinese restaurant promoting a book, Let Me Tell You a Story, written with John Feinstein.

I wanted to see Red in person to say thanks for the many memories I had of him and the Boston Celtics as a child. I also wanted to thank him for the impact he had on me in so many other ways growing up, and the things that stuck with we me as I reached adulthood and fatherhood. It was because of Red that sitting on the sofa watching basketball with my son became treasured memories. It was because of Red I spent ten years coaching kids in the fundamentals of the game and of life. I wonder who got more out of the experience, them or me.

I was a basketball fan, and an avid reader because of Red. My earliest memories of reading were of the Celtics exploits and Red's shenanigans. During basketball season there wasn't a day that went by that I didn't scour the Boston Globe for any word about our team.

Yes basketball is just a game and in the course of human history it has virtually no impact or importance however there are elements of the way in which Auerbach conducted his life and business that have impacted many an individual's life.

Boston in the sixties was not a place of much racial tolerance. There were racial divides that resulted in some ugly scenes as busing was being forced upon the region. These events were completely lost on Auerbach. As Boston and much of the country was resisting integration, Auerbach was a pioneer.

While the Red Sox were the last team in the majors to integrate, Auerbach was accomplishing the following: Drafted the first black player, Chuck Cooper into the NBA. He was the first coach ever to start an all black starting five and he appointed the first black coach in any sport when Bill Russell succeeded him as the Celtic head coach. Auerbach was about merit and achievement not about colors except one, Celtic green.

I have no doubt that Red has gone on to his reward.

Phil Gallagher   10 29 06

It is almost two years to the day since I last saw Red. It was October 29th 2004, one day after the Sox had clinched the World Series. Red was appearing at a local Chinese restaurant promoting a book, Let Me Tell You a Story, written with John Feinstein.

I wanted to see Red in person to say thanks for the many memories I had of him and the Boston Celtics as a child. I also wanted to thank him for the impact he had on me in so many other ways growing up, and the things that stuck with we me as I reached adulthood and fatherhood. It was because of Red that sitting on the sofa watching basketball with my son became treasured memories. It was because of Red I spent ten years coaching kids in the fundamentals of the game and of life. I wonder who got more out of the experience, them or me.

I was a basketball fan, and an avid reader because of Red. My earliest memories of reading were of the Celtics exploits and Red's shenanigans. During basketball season there wasn't a day that went by that I didn't scour the Boston Globe for any word about our team.

Yes basketball is just a game and in the course of human history it has virtually no impact or importance however there are elements of the way in which Auerbach conducted his life and business that have impacted many an individual's life.

Boston in the sixties was not a place of much racial tolerance. There were racial divides that resulted in some ugly scenes as busing was being forced upon the region. These events were completely lost on Auerbach. As Boston and much of the country was resisting integration, Auerbach was a pioneer.

While the Red Sox were the last team in the majors to integrate, Auerbach was accomplishing the following: Drafted the first black player, Chuck Cooper into the NBA. He was the first coach ever to start an all black starting five and he appointed the first black coach in any sport when Bill Russell succeeded him as the Celtic head coach. Auerbach was about merit and achievement not about colors except one, Celtic green.

I have no doubt that Red has gone on to his reward.

Phil Gallagher   10 29 06