A jaw-dropping program from the BBC

From the UK Times:

The BBC is placing Christianity at the heart of primetime entertainment for the first time, with programmes examining faith and spirituality set to replace copycat 'lifestyle' shows.

However, the first fruits of the born—again fervour could prove controversial. Rageh Omaar, the former Iraq war correspondent who wrote a book on his experiences as a British Muslim, will conduct a three—part examination of Jesus's miracles.

Omaar travelled to the Sea of Galilee, looking at the historical and archaeological evidence for events such as the Feeding of the 5,000, Jesus walking on water and the Resurrection itself.

The series asks if the banquet of loaves and fishes was an act of mass delusion and if the crucified body of Jesus was thrown to dogs in a rubbish dump.

Christian groups are concerned. Peter Kearney, a spokesman for the Catholic bishops in Scotland, asked: 'Can you imagine the BBC asking a prominent Christian like Cliff Richard to present a critical look at Islam?'

The BBC said that the series was not designed to provoke a Christian backlash. Adam Kemp, the BBC's head of religious commissioning, said:

'It is Rageh's journey to find out what the miracles reveal about Jesus and who people at the time believed Jesus really was. There are beautiful reconstructions of the miracles.'

The program apparently already played, as the article is dated from last July.

Andrew G. Bostom  10 29 06

From the UK Times:

The BBC is placing Christianity at the heart of primetime entertainment for the first time, with programmes examining faith and spirituality set to replace copycat 'lifestyle' shows.

However, the first fruits of the born—again fervour could prove controversial. Rageh Omaar, the former Iraq war correspondent who wrote a book on his experiences as a British Muslim, will conduct a three—part examination of Jesus's miracles.

Omaar travelled to the Sea of Galilee, looking at the historical and archaeological evidence for events such as the Feeding of the 5,000, Jesus walking on water and the Resurrection itself.

The series asks if the banquet of loaves and fishes was an act of mass delusion and if the crucified body of Jesus was thrown to dogs in a rubbish dump.

Christian groups are concerned. Peter Kearney, a spokesman for the Catholic bishops in Scotland, asked: 'Can you imagine the BBC asking a prominent Christian like Cliff Richard to present a critical look at Islam?'

The BBC said that the series was not designed to provoke a Christian backlash. Adam Kemp, the BBC's head of religious commissioning, said:

'It is Rageh's journey to find out what the miracles reveal about Jesus and who people at the time believed Jesus really was. There are beautiful reconstructions of the miracles.'

The program apparently already played, as the article is dated from last July.

Andrew G. Bostom  10 29 06