Wal-Mart gives Dems a tough choice

Wal—Mart announced today that it will start selling some prescription drugs for $4 in a test program in Florida. This is a strong reply to the Democratic critics who are campaigning for office against Wal—Mart. The New York Times has stated that Democrats will run this November as "Wal—Mart Foe."

You may also recall John Kerry has recently denounced Wal—Mart's business practices  and conservative website Townhall.com in the same press conference.   The Democrats, of course, do this at their own peril. It is obvious that a majority of Americans like Wal—Mart and support it — and its business practices — with their dollars. This includes many poor, both minority and non—minority people, both shop and work at Wal—Mart.
 
What do Florida Democrats have to say about this? The liberal Palm Beach Post, in an article today, didn't surprise me when they stated,

"Critics said the plan was a cover for Wal—Mart's failure to provide its employees adequate health care. They contend that the company's benefits are too stingy, forcing taxpayers to absorb more of the cost as the workers lacking coverage turn to state—funded health care programs."

And, for good measure, they added this.

'The initiative — the fourth since last October that Wal—Mart has moved to improve health benefits — drew criticism from one of its most vocal critics, union—backed Wake Up Wal—Mart.

"While lowering prescription drug costs is a good thing, Wal—Mart cruelly ignores the fact that it fails to provide company health care to over half of its employees which leaves 46 percent of its workers children uninsured or on public health care," said Chris Kofinis, spokesman for Wake Up Wal—Mart, in a statement. "Wal—Mart needs to answer one very simple, but serious question — why not just improve the health care coverage of its employees?'

I happen to have lived for months in West Palm Beach Florida's Century Village in 2003, while dealing with my father's illness. I read the Palm Beach Post, rode Century Village's van to the mall to shop and overheard many conversations, some of them quite political. Even shopped in one of the three Wal—Marts in West Palm Beach.

I would bet you my Wynn—Dixie discount card — on Senior Double Coupon Wednesdays, no less — that many of the same people who denounce Wal—Mart will be lined up to shop for drugs there. That is, if the prices are lower or close to those at the Canadian pharmacy satellite store that opened up years ago on in the Century Corners shopping plaza on Okeechobee Blvd., east of Haverhill Road. I wonder how many American workers lost their jobs because liberals in Palm Beach County buy their prescription drugs in Canada. At least Wal—Mart pays corporate taxes and salaries in the US. Don't get me started.
 
Jack Kemp (not the politican)   9 21 06

Wal—Mart announced today that it will start selling some prescription drugs for $4 in a test program in Florida. This is a strong reply to the Democratic critics who are campaigning for office against Wal—Mart. The New York Times has stated that Democrats will run this November as "Wal—Mart Foe."

You may also recall John Kerry has recently denounced Wal—Mart's business practices  and conservative website Townhall.com in the same press conference.   The Democrats, of course, do this at their own peril. It is obvious that a majority of Americans like Wal—Mart and support it — and its business practices — with their dollars. This includes many poor, both minority and non—minority people, both shop and work at Wal—Mart.
 
What do Florida Democrats have to say about this? The liberal Palm Beach Post, in an article today, didn't surprise me when they stated,

"Critics said the plan was a cover for Wal—Mart's failure to provide its employees adequate health care. They contend that the company's benefits are too stingy, forcing taxpayers to absorb more of the cost as the workers lacking coverage turn to state—funded health care programs."

And, for good measure, they added this.

'The initiative — the fourth since last October that Wal—Mart has moved to improve health benefits — drew criticism from one of its most vocal critics, union—backed Wake Up Wal—Mart.

"While lowering prescription drug costs is a good thing, Wal—Mart cruelly ignores the fact that it fails to provide company health care to over half of its employees which leaves 46 percent of its workers children uninsured or on public health care," said Chris Kofinis, spokesman for Wake Up Wal—Mart, in a statement. "Wal—Mart needs to answer one very simple, but serious question — why not just improve the health care coverage of its employees?'

I happen to have lived for months in West Palm Beach Florida's Century Village in 2003, while dealing with my father's illness. I read the Palm Beach Post, rode Century Village's van to the mall to shop and overheard many conversations, some of them quite political. Even shopped in one of the three Wal—Marts in West Palm Beach.

I would bet you my Wynn—Dixie discount card — on Senior Double Coupon Wednesdays, no less — that many of the same people who denounce Wal—Mart will be lined up to shop for drugs there. That is, if the prices are lower or close to those at the Canadian pharmacy satellite store that opened up years ago on in the Century Corners shopping plaza on Okeechobee Blvd., east of Haverhill Road. I wonder how many American workers lost their jobs because liberals in Palm Beach County buy their prescription drugs in Canada. At least Wal—Mart pays corporate taxes and salaries in the US. Don't get me started.
 
Jack Kemp (not the politican)   9 21 06