Remember the anthrax attack following 9/11?

By

Ray Robison does.

"There are two prevailing theories. One theory is that a US scientist did it. The other is that the Saddam regime of Iraq or another rogue government with anthrax capability gave anthrax to al—Qaeda. Other theories abound but I will limit the argument to the two theories that fit the facts best.

"Those who follow the news about the anthrax attack know that for years the FBI has been investigating American defense scientists. Let me be more specific. The FBI has been pursuing U.S. citizens with high level clearances, years of professional experience and demonstrated loyalty to this country. The FBI has found nothing."

Ray finds a lot of problems with this theory. Then, there's the alternative. Ray looks at it with logic and informed perspective, and finds it more probable that Saddam's supply of weaponized anthrax was delivered by Al Qaeda. But, as he notes, a lot of people have made up their minds that no such collaboration existed.

"What does your common sense tell you? Most of my friends (usually military) at the time of the attacks believed the anthrax was a continuing, near simultaneous attack with the plane hijackings of 9/11. It seemed like a combined arms attack, a fundamental of modern warfare. Could it just be so simple that al Qaeda hit us not once, but twice in a week? And what would the effect of such a scenario be on an FBI charged with the domestic counterterrorism mission? Would a second al Qaeda attack rub salt on an already horrible wound? And wouldn't it be better for the FBI if the second attack was done by a military scientist, thus the Department of Defense's fault and not a subsequent FBI counterterrorism failure? There are still a lot of questions and for me the answer is and always will be that until I see the proof I will never believe an American scientist did this instead of al Qaeda. I just don't believe it."

Thomas Lifson   9 27 06

Ray Robison does.

"There are two prevailing theories. One theory is that a US scientist did it. The other is that the Saddam regime of Iraq or another rogue government with anthrax capability gave anthrax to al—Qaeda. Other theories abound but I will limit the argument to the two theories that fit the facts best.

"Those who follow the news about the anthrax attack know that for years the FBI has been investigating American defense scientists. Let me be more specific. The FBI has been pursuing U.S. citizens with high level clearances, years of professional experience and demonstrated loyalty to this country. The FBI has found nothing."

Ray finds a lot of problems with this theory. Then, there's the alternative. Ray looks at it with logic and informed perspective, and finds it more probable that Saddam's supply of weaponized anthrax was delivered by Al Qaeda. But, as he notes, a lot of people have made up their minds that no such collaboration existed.

"What does your common sense tell you? Most of my friends (usually military) at the time of the attacks believed the anthrax was a continuing, near simultaneous attack with the plane hijackings of 9/11. It seemed like a combined arms attack, a fundamental of modern warfare. Could it just be so simple that al Qaeda hit us not once, but twice in a week? And what would the effect of such a scenario be on an FBI charged with the domestic counterterrorism mission? Would a second al Qaeda attack rub salt on an already horrible wound? And wouldn't it be better for the FBI if the second attack was done by a military scientist, thus the Department of Defense's fault and not a subsequent FBI counterterrorism failure? There are still a lot of questions and for me the answer is and always will be that until I see the proof I will never believe an American scientist did this instead of al Qaeda. I just don't believe it."

Thomas Lifson   9 27 06