Political correctness for cash

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It is beginning to look like PC objections to sports teams being named after Indians tribes can be something of a shakedown. That, at least, is the implication of an article published in the Deseret News of Salt Lake City.

One year ago, University of Utah President Michael Young noted the "mutually respectful" relationship with the Ute Indian Tribe when he appealed NCAA restrictions on the school's nickname — the Utes.

At the time, the state's top Native American official sang the U.'s praises. "The University of Utah has demonstrated outstanding regard for the Ute Tribe," said Forrest Cuch, a Ute and director of the Utah Division of Indian Affairs.

Now his attitude has changed.

"I'm disappointed, and I think the Ute Tribe is, too," Cuch says.

At issue is whether the U. agreed last year to provide scholarships for Ute students in exchange for tribal approval to retain the nickname.

"We were under the impression that it was all under way," said Cameron Cuch, former Ute Tribe education director.

University officials told the tribe an alumni donor had agreed to contribute to the scholarships, he said. "We were made to feel as though these things were being put in place."

It is all couched in euphemisms. One demonstrates "respect" by coughing up cash of racially—exclusive scholarships. But if something is "offensive", how does that change just by the provision of cash?

via Inside Higher Education

Hat tip: Joe Crowley

Thomas Lifson   9 19 06

It is beginning to look like PC objections to sports teams being named after Indians tribes can be something of a shakedown. That, at least, is the implication of an article published in the Deseret News of Salt Lake City.

One year ago, University of Utah President Michael Young noted the "mutually respectful" relationship with the Ute Indian Tribe when he appealed NCAA restrictions on the school's nickname — the Utes.

At the time, the state's top Native American official sang the U.'s praises. "The University of Utah has demonstrated outstanding regard for the Ute Tribe," said Forrest Cuch, a Ute and director of the Utah Division of Indian Affairs.

Now his attitude has changed.

"I'm disappointed, and I think the Ute Tribe is, too," Cuch says.

At issue is whether the U. agreed last year to provide scholarships for Ute students in exchange for tribal approval to retain the nickname.

"We were under the impression that it was all under way," said Cameron Cuch, former Ute Tribe education director.

University officials told the tribe an alumni donor had agreed to contribute to the scholarships, he said. "We were made to feel as though these things were being put in place."

It is all couched in euphemisms. One demonstrates "respect" by coughing up cash of racially—exclusive scholarships. But if something is "offensive", how does that change just by the provision of cash?

via Inside Higher Education

Hat tip: Joe Crowley

Thomas Lifson   9 19 06