Letter to editor

J.R. Dunn wrote a very insightful article.  However it leaves out one aspect of the war on terror.  From a military perspective, the Jihadis have taken the innocent and used them as shields. It is a very difficult matter and no easy answer applies to all conditions.  However if I am the overall commander of the world wide war on terror and am fully aware of the superior fire power I have then I need to flush the enemy into a trap.  The trap must look like a victory to the enemy in order to succeed. Think of Calais.  It must empower the enemy to some degree.  It must ultimately strengthen my position.

The Greeks Mr. Dunn referenced made certain preparations for war.  Cities with long walled corridors to the sea for example were made to supply the city during siege.  In the short term they succeeded.  In the long term disease and food shortages began to crumble the defense from within.

It is possible that the recent abrupt changes in Waziristan amount to a similar strategy.  Allowing the enemy a victory of sorts and relinquishing the area may well draw the enemy to the sanctuary that held off the Soviet Union, the terrain.  Use of our 21st century equipment to follow the enemy in such conditions shifts the balance of power where the enemy can be slowly choked with the fingers around the economic neck of the enemy.  Eventually with the concentration of enemy in a region and unmanned attack weapons and a lack of "Innocents" the enemy can be surgically destroyed.

Just  guess.

Craig Nelson, Malvern , PA   9 14 06

J.R. Dunn wrote a very insightful article.  However it leaves out one aspect of the war on terror.  From a military perspective, the Jihadis have taken the innocent and used them as shields. It is a very difficult matter and no easy answer applies to all conditions.  However if I am the overall commander of the world wide war on terror and am fully aware of the superior fire power I have then I need to flush the enemy into a trap.  The trap must look like a victory to the enemy in order to succeed. Think of Calais.  It must empower the enemy to some degree.  It must ultimately strengthen my position.

The Greeks Mr. Dunn referenced made certain preparations for war.  Cities with long walled corridors to the sea for example were made to supply the city during siege.  In the short term they succeeded.  In the long term disease and food shortages began to crumble the defense from within.

It is possible that the recent abrupt changes in Waziristan amount to a similar strategy.  Allowing the enemy a victory of sorts and relinquishing the area may well draw the enemy to the sanctuary that held off the Soviet Union, the terrain.  Use of our 21st century equipment to follow the enemy in such conditions shifts the balance of power where the enemy can be slowly choked with the fingers around the economic neck of the enemy.  Eventually with the concentration of enemy in a region and unmanned attack weapons and a lack of "Innocents" the enemy can be surgically destroyed.

Just  guess.

Craig Nelson, Malvern , PA   9 14 06