Challenge to Islam continues

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Yesterday the former Archbishop of Canterbury, Lord Carey, gave a speech at a Newbold College, a 7th Day Adventist college and seminary.  The talk was entitled The Cross and the Crescent: The Clash of Faiths in an Age of Secularism.  Lord Carey seemed to take a play out of Pope Benedict's book when in framing his argument he said that contemporary political scientist Samuel Huntington's 'clash of civilizations'  theory had "some validity" and then incorporated the following assessment of Islam by Huntington into his text.

'Islam's borders are bloody and so are its innards. The fundamental problem for the West is not Islamic fundamentalism. It is Islam, a different civilisation whose people are convinced of the superiority of their culture and are obsessed with the inferiority of their power.'

Lord Carey went on to later ask  "Why is it that, although true Islam is not a violent religion, Islam has become associated with violence?'  and that 'The Muslim world must address this matter with great urgency.'
 
I have been unable to find a link to the full text. Here are are links to two very different takes on the speech.  

Rosslyn Smith   9 20 06

Update: A reader who prefers to be identified as Rich has kindly supplied the link:

The link for the speech is here, on Lord Carey's website.

The part of the speech dealing with Benedict is about three quarters of the way through a twelve page speech.

Lord Carey's point is that there must be a dialog between the faiths.

Yesterday the former Archbishop of Canterbury, Lord Carey, gave a speech at a Newbold College, a 7th Day Adventist college and seminary.  The talk was entitled The Cross and the Crescent: The Clash of Faiths in an Age of Secularism.  Lord Carey seemed to take a play out of Pope Benedict's book when in framing his argument he said that contemporary political scientist Samuel Huntington's 'clash of civilizations'  theory had "some validity" and then incorporated the following assessment of Islam by Huntington into his text.

'Islam's borders are bloody and so are its innards. The fundamental problem for the West is not Islamic fundamentalism. It is Islam, a different civilisation whose people are convinced of the superiority of their culture and are obsessed with the inferiority of their power.'

Lord Carey went on to later ask  "Why is it that, although true Islam is not a violent religion, Islam has become associated with violence?'  and that 'The Muslim world must address this matter with great urgency.'
 
I have been unable to find a link to the full text. Here are are links to two very different takes on the speech.  

Rosslyn Smith   9 20 06

Update: A reader who prefers to be identified as Rich has kindly supplied the link:

The link for the speech is here, on Lord Carey's website.

The part of the speech dealing with Benedict is about three quarters of the way through a twelve page speech.

Lord Carey's point is that there must be a dialog between the faiths.