Byzantium, Pope Benedict XVI and YouTube

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The Pope knew exactly what he was doing in his address at Regensburg. I am becoming more and more convinced that the pontiff is three or four steps ahead of the rest of us in his thinking about the way that public consciousness is shaped. I even wonder if His Holiness has surfed YouTube.

Lest you think I jest, this little video from The People's Cube is well worth viewing. As a mere slinger of words, I am painfully aware of the power of images, both still and video. Though I am not skilled in the tools of video production, I am told that the technology is now accessible to ordinary folk. American Thinker will soon be introducing a redesigned home page, which, combined with a new software platform and vastly enhanced server capacity, will enable us to post more audiovisual content.

My pal Jack Risko of Dinocrat calls the advent of YouTube, the video iPod, and associated opening—up of the technology of video production and distribution "New Media 4.0". As usual, Jack is both correct and ahead of the rest of us. Most people grasp complicated history much better when presented in audiovisual format than in words. The People's Cube shows how it is done.

The Pope knew that controversy over his remarks would call more attention to the underlying phenomenon. I think he also knew that in this new age of internet—powered information production and distribution, the underlying facts — the context within which he spoke — would become gradually known and understood by his flock, and by the world public.

So watch the video. Please. Maybe even send it to a friend or two.

Hat tips: Average Gay Joe and Larwyn

Thomas Lifson   9 27 06

The Pope knew exactly what he was doing in his address at Regensburg. I am becoming more and more convinced that the pontiff is three or four steps ahead of the rest of us in his thinking about the way that public consciousness is shaped. I even wonder if His Holiness has surfed YouTube.

Lest you think I jest, this little video from The People's Cube is well worth viewing. As a mere slinger of words, I am painfully aware of the power of images, both still and video. Though I am not skilled in the tools of video production, I am told that the technology is now accessible to ordinary folk. American Thinker will soon be introducing a redesigned home page, which, combined with a new software platform and vastly enhanced server capacity, will enable us to post more audiovisual content.

My pal Jack Risko of Dinocrat calls the advent of YouTube, the video iPod, and associated opening—up of the technology of video production and distribution "New Media 4.0". As usual, Jack is both correct and ahead of the rest of us. Most people grasp complicated history much better when presented in audiovisual format than in words. The People's Cube shows how it is done.

The Pope knew that controversy over his remarks would call more attention to the underlying phenomenon. I think he also knew that in this new age of internet—powered information production and distribution, the underlying facts — the context within which he spoke — would become gradually known and understood by his flock, and by the world public.

So watch the video. Please. Maybe even send it to a friend or two.

Hat tips: Average Gay Joe and Larwyn

Thomas Lifson   9 27 06