What Ever Happened to Plan A?

You've got to be 21 to buy a beer in most of the country. In New York, the age is 18 for a pack of smokes, and there are some efforts afoot to raise it to 21. But under the FDA's decision this week, the Plan B "morning after" contraception kit is available over—the—counter to one and all —— except youngsters below the age of 18, who still require a doctor's prescription to obtain the pills.

As the SF Chronicle reports on its SFGate* Web site,

"The decision, which ended a three—year battle within the FDA, was considered a compromise by pro—choice and women's health advocates who had hoped to win over—the—counter approval for all women, regardless of age."

This annoys and aggravates the proponents of free and easy sex without consequences, such as the Planned Parenthood folks, whose President, Cecile Richards, was quoted as saying,

"Planned Parenthood is troubled by the scientifically baseless restriction imposed on teenagers."

One of the outlandish arguments being given for allowing youngsters to drop in to any local drugstore for a quick "fix" is the supposed difficulty of finding a doctor late at night or on weekends or holidays —— as if there were no 24—hour hospital ERs (where a physician might exercise some adult judgement).

If the past is any prediction of the future, I expect the promiscuity promoters will continue to lobby until they achieve their goal of making it legal and easy for any 14— or 15—year—old to hop out of a bed she shouldn't have been in the first place and pick up a couple of pills to ensure that there won't be any consequences (except perhaps emotional or of the STD variety) for her immature behavior.

How do the parents and grandparents of these young girls feel about the prospect of sexual adventurism made freer and easier than drinking a beer or smoking a cigarette? Nobody seems to have asked.

And, what about the ages—old preference for Plan A —— the plan to avoid mindless sex by underage tweenies instead of having society act as an enabler and facilitator?

Richard N. Weltz   8 25 06

You've got to be 21 to buy a beer in most of the country. In New York, the age is 18 for a pack of smokes, and there are some efforts afoot to raise it to 21. But under the FDA's decision this week, the Plan B "morning after" contraception kit is available over—the—counter to one and all —— except youngsters below the age of 18, who still require a doctor's prescription to obtain the pills.

As the SF Chronicle reports on its SFGate* Web site,

"The decision, which ended a three—year battle within the FDA, was considered a compromise by pro—choice and women's health advocates who had hoped to win over—the—counter approval for all women, regardless of age."

This annoys and aggravates the proponents of free and easy sex without consequences, such as the Planned Parenthood folks, whose President, Cecile Richards, was quoted as saying,

"Planned Parenthood is troubled by the scientifically baseless restriction imposed on teenagers."

One of the outlandish arguments being given for allowing youngsters to drop in to any local drugstore for a quick "fix" is the supposed difficulty of finding a doctor late at night or on weekends or holidays —— as if there were no 24—hour hospital ERs (where a physician might exercise some adult judgement).

If the past is any prediction of the future, I expect the promiscuity promoters will continue to lobby until they achieve their goal of making it legal and easy for any 14— or 15—year—old to hop out of a bed she shouldn't have been in the first place and pick up a couple of pills to ensure that there won't be any consequences (except perhaps emotional or of the STD variety) for her immature behavior.

How do the parents and grandparents of these young girls feel about the prospect of sexual adventurism made freer and easier than drinking a beer or smoking a cigarette? Nobody seems to have asked.

And, what about the ages—old preference for Plan A —— the plan to avoid mindless sex by underage tweenies instead of having society act as an enabler and facilitator?

Richard N. Weltz   8 25 06