Wal-Mart hatred on display in LA Times

The Los Angeles Times publishes an op—ed by Erin Aubry Kaplan that is startling on both its rhetorical hatred for Wal—Mart and its easygoing attitude toward black racism against Koreans, Jews, and others who operate retail stores in black neighborhoods. The article analyzes the recent resignation/firing of Andrew Young as a spokesman for Wal—Mart, and finds him innocent of racism but guilty of working for Wal—Mart.

Ms. Kaplan even throws around the f—word (the other f—word, that is):

The biggest company in the world has grown ever—more unpopular as its worldwide exploitation of workers, including a determination to keep unions away that can be described as fascist, has become more well known.

Does Ms. Kaplan regard the geriatic vest—garbed Wal—Mart greeters as some sort of corps of storm troopers? Are they the new Black Shirts, breaking up union rallies wielding clubs? I must have missed that, along with all the torchlight parades.

Does anyone in an editorial position actually bother reading op—eds at the LA Times before they publish them? Or has the rot gotten so far that "fascist" just means "I don't them" to the editors?

Some other choice passages:

He said it badly, and in painting all those merchants as uncaring and unethical, he said it too broadly. But he had a point.

Ms. Kaplan buys into the theory it is an evil conspiracy of what Al Sharpton called "interlopers" that keeps prices too high in black neighborhoods. If that were true, then there would be a fabulous opportunity for black entrepreneurs to open stores and undercut the Jews, Koreans, and Arabs about whom Young "has a point."

Where has this ever happened?

Don't get me wrong: Young paid the appropriate price. But the real vulgarity is the dire economic picture in black and brown neighborhoods represented all too well by the overabundance of "stale bread, and bad meat and wilted vegetables" that Young cited. Loaf for loaf, a Wal—Mart Supercenter might have better food. But it — and Young — hardly have the right stuff

So what is Ms. Kaplan's plan? If Wal—Mart doesn't have the right stuff, who does? Target?

Thomas Lifson   8 23 06

The Los Angeles Times publishes an op—ed by Erin Aubry Kaplan that is startling on both its rhetorical hatred for Wal—Mart and its easygoing attitude toward black racism against Koreans, Jews, and others who operate retail stores in black neighborhoods. The article analyzes the recent resignation/firing of Andrew Young as a spokesman for Wal—Mart, and finds him innocent of racism but guilty of working for Wal—Mart.

Ms. Kaplan even throws around the f—word (the other f—word, that is):

The biggest company in the world has grown ever—more unpopular as its worldwide exploitation of workers, including a determination to keep unions away that can be described as fascist, has become more well known.

Does Ms. Kaplan regard the geriatic vest—garbed Wal—Mart greeters as some sort of corps of storm troopers? Are they the new Black Shirts, breaking up union rallies wielding clubs? I must have missed that, along with all the torchlight parades.

Does anyone in an editorial position actually bother reading op—eds at the LA Times before they publish them? Or has the rot gotten so far that "fascist" just means "I don't them" to the editors?

Some other choice passages:

He said it badly, and in painting all those merchants as uncaring and unethical, he said it too broadly. But he had a point.

Ms. Kaplan buys into the theory it is an evil conspiracy of what Al Sharpton called "interlopers" that keeps prices too high in black neighborhoods. If that were true, then there would be a fabulous opportunity for black entrepreneurs to open stores and undercut the Jews, Koreans, and Arabs about whom Young "has a point."

Where has this ever happened?

Don't get me wrong: Young paid the appropriate price. But the real vulgarity is the dire economic picture in black and brown neighborhoods represented all too well by the overabundance of "stale bread, and bad meat and wilted vegetables" that Young cited. Loaf for loaf, a Wal—Mart Supercenter might have better food. But it — and Young — hardly have the right stuff

So what is Ms. Kaplan's plan? If Wal—Mart doesn't have the right stuff, who does? Target?

Thomas Lifson   8 23 06