The vanishing Democrat talking point

Dems have turned turn mum on the "culture of corruption." The Washington Times notes

Democrats have reined in their use of the "culture of corruption" mantra in their efforts to oust congressional Republicans from power, fearing the slogan would backfire after two senior members of their own party were implicated in ethical scandals. 

Last year, minority—party leaders announced that they would offer something different from a culture of corruption, after a series of indictments and resignations involving Majority Leader Tom DeLay and other Republican lawmakers. The phrase became a regular Democratic refrain.

Then, FBI officials revealed they found $90,000 in marked $100 bills in Rep. William J. Jefferson's freezer, and the Democrats opted to change course. Now, House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi of California, who is regularly asked why the term has been shelved, spins the culture of corruption question to say Republicans are incompetent and beholden to special interests.

She also told the Hill newspaper in June that Democrats' "culture of corruption" message was ending, and it was "time to talk about us."

Mrs. Pelosi did trot out the line last week in a statement about Mr. DeLay, under indictment by a Texas grand jury on money—laundering charges.

Ed Lasky   8 07 06

Dems have turned turn mum on the "culture of corruption." The Washington Times notes

Democrats have reined in their use of the "culture of corruption" mantra in their efforts to oust congressional Republicans from power, fearing the slogan would backfire after two senior members of their own party were implicated in ethical scandals. 

Last year, minority—party leaders announced that they would offer something different from a culture of corruption, after a series of indictments and resignations involving Majority Leader Tom DeLay and other Republican lawmakers. The phrase became a regular Democratic refrain.

Then, FBI officials revealed they found $90,000 in marked $100 bills in Rep. William J. Jefferson's freezer, and the Democrats opted to change course. Now, House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi of California, who is regularly asked why the term has been shelved, spins the culture of corruption question to say Republicans are incompetent and beholden to special interests.

She also told the Hill newspaper in June that Democrats' "culture of corruption" message was ending, and it was "time to talk about us."

Mrs. Pelosi did trot out the line last week in a statement about Mr. DeLay, under indictment by a Texas grand jury on money—laundering charges.

Ed Lasky   8 07 06