Israel Must Win

Daniel Rivkin, Jr and Lee Casey, who have both been in the forefront of defenders of Israel in the American media, now question Israel's course in a Haaretz article entitled "Israel must win." The failure of resolve on the part of Ehud Olmert puts at risk Israel's value to America and thus the special friendship and alliance that have bonded the nations. It has been a two—way street. Israel has defended American interests over the years, as noted by the authors

These successes ranged from humbling the Soviet Union's Cold War Arab clients, proving the superiority of America's weapons over Russia's (the IDF's 1982 downing of 85 Syrian MIGs being a perfect case in point), to providing invaluable intelligence and being a democracy in a sea of autocracies.

Israel's successful 1981 Osirak mission was another excellent example of its strategic value in the Middle East. An Israel that could defang Saddam's nuclear program could also credibly offer the United States help against Iran's looming nuclear threat.

Does Israel's failure to deal a decisive blow to Hezbollah now make Israel look less like an ally and more like a liability? Will this weakness harm the bi—partisan support for Israel that it has long enjoyed in America as anti—Israel forces within the Democratic Party grow in force? The authors' attempt to answer these questions is vital reading.

Ed Lasky   8 11 06 7:47 AM PDT

Daniel Rivkin, Jr and Lee Casey, who have both been in the forefront of defenders of Israel in the American media, now question Israel's course in a Haaretz article entitled "Israel must win." The failure of resolve on the part of Ehud Olmert puts at risk Israel's value to America and thus the special friendship and alliance that have bonded the nations. It has been a two—way street. Israel has defended American interests over the years, as noted by the authors

These successes ranged from humbling the Soviet Union's Cold War Arab clients, proving the superiority of America's weapons over Russia's (the IDF's 1982 downing of 85 Syrian MIGs being a perfect case in point), to providing invaluable intelligence and being a democracy in a sea of autocracies.

Israel's successful 1981 Osirak mission was another excellent example of its strategic value in the Middle East. An Israel that could defang Saddam's nuclear program could also credibly offer the United States help against Iran's looming nuclear threat.

Does Israel's failure to deal a decisive blow to Hezbollah now make Israel look less like an ally and more like a liability? Will this weakness harm the bi—partisan support for Israel that it has long enjoyed in America as anti—Israel forces within the Democratic Party grow in force? The authors' attempt to answer these questions is vital reading.

Ed Lasky   8 11 06 7:47 AM PDT