Gaza disengagement: one year later

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The Israel Project marks today as the first anniversary of Isarel's disengagement from Gaza, as in the forced evacuation of Jewish settlers. It does not report much good coming from it.

The disengagement plan required Israelis to give up their homes, places of work and worship, their schools and the farms where they grew everything from celery to bell peppers. After making these painful sacrifices for peace, Israelis for the past year have faced serious threats from Palestinian terror groups in Gaza that have fired rockets into Israel almost immediately after the withdrawal was completed.

After the withdrawal:

  • 1,360 of the evictees51 percent of adults — are still unemployed
  • 1,400 families continue to live in temporary housing
  • 100 families live in hotels
  • It will take at least 1 more year to build permanent housing for those uprooted from their homes
  • 38 of the 220 farmers living in Gaza were able to resume limited agricultural work but lost their markets
  • 140 of the evacuees have set up businesses; by contrast, 620 owned businesses before disengagement
  • 30 percent of schoolchildren who had to leave their communities aren't able to adjust to their new schools
  • The cost of disengagement to date — NIS 9 billion ($2 billion) — is expected to increase
  • 0 Israelis, dead or alive, remain in Gaza
  • More than 1,600 attacks ranging from rockets and suicide bombings to small arms fire have been perpetrated against Israelis by Palestinian terrorists 
  • More than 500 rockets have been fired into Israel from Gaza
  • 1.4 million Palestinians living in the Gaza Strip, many of them in Palestinian Authority—controlled refugee camps, now live under their own leaders 
  • Israel's withdrawal from four northern West Bank settlements created an area more than twice the size of Gaza's 140 square miles under Palestinian control and devoid of any Israeli presence

Hat tip: Ed Lasky   8 15 06

The Israel Project marks today as the first anniversary of Isarel's disengagement from Gaza, as in the forced evacuation of Jewish settlers. It does not report much good coming from it.

The disengagement plan required Israelis to give up their homes, places of work and worship, their schools and the farms where they grew everything from celery to bell peppers. After making these painful sacrifices for peace, Israelis for the past year have faced serious threats from Palestinian terror groups in Gaza that have fired rockets into Israel almost immediately after the withdrawal was completed.

After the withdrawal:

  • 1,360 of the evictees51 percent of adults — are still unemployed
  • 1,400 families continue to live in temporary housing
  • 100 families live in hotels
  • It will take at least 1 more year to build permanent housing for those uprooted from their homes
  • 38 of the 220 farmers living in Gaza were able to resume limited agricultural work but lost their markets
  • 140 of the evacuees have set up businesses; by contrast, 620 owned businesses before disengagement
  • 30 percent of schoolchildren who had to leave their communities aren't able to adjust to their new schools
  • The cost of disengagement to date — NIS 9 billion ($2 billion) — is expected to increase
  • 0 Israelis, dead or alive, remain in Gaza
  • More than 1,600 attacks ranging from rockets and suicide bombings to small arms fire have been perpetrated against Israelis by Palestinian terrorists 
  • More than 500 rockets have been fired into Israel from Gaza
  • 1.4 million Palestinians living in the Gaza Strip, many of them in Palestinian Authority—controlled refugee camps, now live under their own leaders 
  • Israel's withdrawal from four northern West Bank settlements created an area more than twice the size of Gaza's 140 square miles under Palestinian control and devoid of any Israeli presence

Hat tip: Ed Lasky   8 15 06