CBS to broadcast death threat against President Bush

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Ahmadinejad will tell the world on this Sunday's Sixty Minutes that

"Those who refuse to accept an invitation will not have a good ending or fate."

The reference is to his letter to President Bush last May, in imitation of Mohammed's invitation to his enemies to submit to Islam before waging jihad and killing them. Failing to accept that invitation to submit meant death.

Or as the letter proclaimed at the end

"Peace be upon only those who follow in the path of the true faith." (italics added)

In his interview with an abject Mike Wallace, Ahmadinejad says:

"Well, (with the letter) I wanted to open a window towards the light for the president so that he can see that one can look on the world through a different perspective," he said.

The Bush administration, however, dismissed the 18—page letter as little more than a rambling philosophical treatise that offered nothing new on the nuclear crisis.

Ahmadinejad scoffed at Bush for refusing his "invitation" in the form of his letter.

"We are all free to choose. But please give him this message, sir: Those who refuse to accept an invitation will not have a good ending or fate," he said.

There has been some debate about the meaning of the letter. Now we know. Think again

"We are all free to choose. But please give him this message, sir: Those who refuse to accept an invitation will not have a good ending or fate."

James Lewis   8 10 06

Ahmadinejad will tell the world on this Sunday's Sixty Minutes that

"Those who refuse to accept an invitation will not have a good ending or fate."

The reference is to his letter to President Bush last May, in imitation of Mohammed's invitation to his enemies to submit to Islam before waging jihad and killing them. Failing to accept that invitation to submit meant death.

Or as the letter proclaimed at the end

"Peace be upon only those who follow in the path of the true faith." (italics added)

In his interview with an abject Mike Wallace, Ahmadinejad says:

"Well, (with the letter) I wanted to open a window towards the light for the president so that he can see that one can look on the world through a different perspective," he said.

The Bush administration, however, dismissed the 18—page letter as little more than a rambling philosophical treatise that offered nothing new on the nuclear crisis.

Ahmadinejad scoffed at Bush for refusing his "invitation" in the form of his letter.

"We are all free to choose. But please give him this message, sir: Those who refuse to accept an invitation will not have a good ending or fate," he said.

There has been some debate about the meaning of the letter. Now we know. Think again

"We are all free to choose. But please give him this message, sir: Those who refuse to accept an invitation will not have a good ending or fate."

James Lewis   8 10 06