The Fighting Sioux never give up

Richard Baehr wrote an article for AT about the University of North Dakota Fighting Sioux over a year ago. The NCAA is on the warpath against some schools with team mascots deemed "offensive" to certain minorities, while others, most notably Notre Dame's Fighting Irish, get a pass. Racial discrimination?

Charles Kupchella, president of the University of North Dakota, is embodying the undying spirit celebrated by his school's adoption of the Fighting Sioux name, and resisting NCAA pressure. Eric Fettmann of the New York Post recently published an excellent column on the subject, making the NCAA look as ridiculous as it truly is.

The madness of political correctness knows few boundaries. The high school I attended in Minneapolis, one of the nation's most PC cities, used to call its teams "The Indians." We were all clear that the qualities of bravery, endurance, loyalty, honor, and other warlike vitues were being celebrated. Exactly as is the case in North Dakota. We were proud of the name.

But PC being PC, the name had to go. The school's teams are now called "The Lakers" (the school is near two of the lakes for which Minneapolis is justly famous). But of course the name is most famous as that of the Los Angeles basketball team.

A couple of years ago, the PC maniacs threatened to jackhammer out of the floor of the school's main entrance a bronze medallion about the size of a manhole cover which contained the Indian head logo of the team. It had been installed by a Depression—era artist, a custom—crafted genuine piece of art, something that would cost tens of thousands of dollars to recreate. When I was a student, the custom was to never step on it, as a way of honoring the team mascot.

Fortunately, the historic preservationists were aroused to the extent of foiling the PC crowd, and the logo, I am told, survives. The University of North Dakota's hockey arena, the gift of a billionaire alumnus, incorporates UND's Sioux Indian head logo throughout. I hope the University continues its noble struggle to preserve this heritage. Someday this madness will pass.

Thomas Lifson   7 3 06

Richard Baehr wrote an article for AT about the University of North Dakota Fighting Sioux over a year ago. The NCAA is on the warpath against some schools with team mascots deemed "offensive" to certain minorities, while others, most notably Notre Dame's Fighting Irish, get a pass. Racial discrimination?

Charles Kupchella, president of the University of North Dakota, is embodying the undying spirit celebrated by his school's adoption of the Fighting Sioux name, and resisting NCAA pressure. Eric Fettmann of the New York Post recently published an excellent column on the subject, making the NCAA look as ridiculous as it truly is.

The madness of political correctness knows few boundaries. The high school I attended in Minneapolis, one of the nation's most PC cities, used to call its teams "The Indians." We were all clear that the qualities of bravery, endurance, loyalty, honor, and other warlike vitues were being celebrated. Exactly as is the case in North Dakota. We were proud of the name.

But PC being PC, the name had to go. The school's teams are now called "The Lakers" (the school is near two of the lakes for which Minneapolis is justly famous). But of course the name is most famous as that of the Los Angeles basketball team.

A couple of years ago, the PC maniacs threatened to jackhammer out of the floor of the school's main entrance a bronze medallion about the size of a manhole cover which contained the Indian head logo of the team. It had been installed by a Depression—era artist, a custom—crafted genuine piece of art, something that would cost tens of thousands of dollars to recreate. When I was a student, the custom was to never step on it, as a way of honoring the team mascot.

Fortunately, the historic preservationists were aroused to the extent of foiling the PC crowd, and the logo, I am told, survives. The University of North Dakota's hockey arena, the gift of a billionaire alumnus, incorporates UND's Sioux Indian head logo throughout. I hope the University continues its noble struggle to preserve this heritage. Someday this madness will pass.

Thomas Lifson   7 3 06