Paul Krugman distorts the WSJ

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Krugman's thesis today in his column "The Treason Card" (behind the Times Select Wall) is that Bush and the Republicans exploited 9/11 to enact tax cuts and appoint right—wing judges. He misreads the WSJ editorial he cites. T

he preamble of the editorial (and laced throughout the opinion piece) are thoughts that the highest principle must be to strengthen the nation's defenses so we can meet threats to our security. The tax cuts the Journal emphasizes were not to the wealthy (as Krugman implies) but to encourage investment so as to strengthen our economy, and thus our nation, so we could afford security measures.

The WSJ piece highlights the absolute need for peace and how this relates to national prosperity. The piece points out the need for energy security — which many of Krugman's colleagues (especially Tom Friedman) also feel are important. Realizing that the peace of the world is also dependent on world trade, the WSJ also advocated that America take steps to ensure that world trade continue to grow to help ensure world peace.

Krugman willfully mischaracterized the WSJ piece: it was not a call for tax cuts to the rich or for the appointment of "right—wing" judicial appointments" (by the way, "right wing", "conservative" or "Republican" are words that do not appear in the tiny section of the WSJ piece that discuss judicial appointments); it was a clarion call to enact measures to strengthen the economy as a way to ensure our security and world peace.

Ed Lasky   7 7 06

Krugman's thesis today in his column "The Treason Card" (behind the Times Select Wall) is that Bush and the Republicans exploited 9/11 to enact tax cuts and appoint right—wing judges. He misreads the WSJ editorial he cites. T

he preamble of the editorial (and laced throughout the opinion piece) are thoughts that the highest principle must be to strengthen the nation's defenses so we can meet threats to our security. The tax cuts the Journal emphasizes were not to the wealthy (as Krugman implies) but to encourage investment so as to strengthen our economy, and thus our nation, so we could afford security measures.

The WSJ piece highlights the absolute need for peace and how this relates to national prosperity. The piece points out the need for energy security — which many of Krugman's colleagues (especially Tom Friedman) also feel are important. Realizing that the peace of the world is also dependent on world trade, the WSJ also advocated that America take steps to ensure that world trade continue to grow to help ensure world peace.

Krugman willfully mischaracterized the WSJ piece: it was not a call for tax cuts to the rich or for the appointment of "right—wing" judicial appointments" (by the way, "right wing", "conservative" or "Republican" are words that do not appear in the tiny section of the WSJ piece that discuss judicial appointments); it was a clarion call to enact measures to strengthen the economy as a way to ensure our security and world peace.

Ed Lasky   7 7 06