More public higher education scandal for California

The San Francisco Chronicle continues its investigation of the pay practices in state—run higher education, moving from the University of California System to the California State University System, the second tier of campuses. The same sort of practices seem to be occurring: high officials given extra compensation in large amounts, with little or no notice to the trustees or the public.

Millions of dollars worth of extra compensation has been handed out to California State University campus presidents and other top executives as they leave their posts —— without public disclosure by the chancellor and the university's Board of Trustees.

Of the 44,000 people employed by the CSU system, a review by The Chronicle found that a handful of past and present officials in the university's 29 highest—paid positions benefit in part from policies designed specifically for an inner circle of top administrators.

Whether it's "transition pay," a multiyear consulting contract or a coveted tenured teaching position, the executives have for a decade or more received these little—known perks to cushion their departure from —— and in some cases return to —— the nation's largest public university system.

For example, some retired campus presidents and other executives have been given "special assignments" and kept on the payroll for up to five years after leaving office. Several executives were retained on the payroll even after taking jobs elsewhere.

These opportunities —— not available to rank—and—file employees —— have been handed out as students have seen their tuition costs increase by 76 percent over the past three years.

The San Francisco Chronicle continues its investigation of the pay practices in state—run higher education, moving from the University of California System to the California State University System, the second tier of campuses. The same sort of practices seem to be occurring: high officials given extra compensation in large amounts, with little or no notice to the trustees or the public.

Millions of dollars worth of extra compensation has been handed out to California State University campus presidents and other top executives as they leave their posts —— without public disclosure by the chancellor and the university's Board of Trustees.

Of the 44,000 people employed by the CSU system, a review by The Chronicle found that a handful of past and present officials in the university's 29 highest—paid positions benefit in part from policies designed specifically for an inner circle of top administrators.

Whether it's "transition pay," a multiyear consulting contract or a coveted tenured teaching position, the executives have for a decade or more received these little—known perks to cushion their departure from —— and in some cases return to —— the nation's largest public university system.

For example, some retired campus presidents and other executives have been given "special assignments" and kept on the payroll for up to five years after leaving office. Several executives were retained on the payroll even after taking jobs elsewhere.

These opportunities —— not available to rank—and—file employees —— have been handed out as students have seen their tuition costs increase by 76 percent over the past three years.