Mass. prepares to dispute Census in 2010

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Massachusetts is one of the bluest of the blue states, with stagnant population growth (negative in some years), despite a yearly influx of young people from elsewhere, thanks to the state's many excellent colleges and universities. As a result, the state faces the possible loss of one or even two Congressional seats to fast—growing states like Texas and Utah.

Rather than address the root causes of the state's population stragnation (high housing costs, and other impediments to child—rearing by middle class families), the state is preparing to launch a research effort aimed at generating a bigger count, and possibly disputing a future census count, according to this Boston Globe report.

With millions of dollars in federal funds at stake, state lawmakers have set aside $100,000 to make sure that immigrants, students, and low—wage earners are counted in the next US Census. [....]

Mayor Thomas M. Menino said yesterday that the funding will allow the state to come up with its own population numbers and not have to rely on federal figures.

``I endorse this move by the Legislature wholeheartedly, " Menino said. ``If the numbers the Census Bureau gives us continue, there's a good chance we'll lose a congressional seat. Their numbers also jeopardize our chances of receiving our fair share of federal funds. We haven't had any way to validate the numbers. This will give us an accurate count."

Ed Lasky   7 5 06

Massachusetts is one of the bluest of the blue states, with stagnant population growth (negative in some years), despite a yearly influx of young people from elsewhere, thanks to the state's many excellent colleges and universities. As a result, the state faces the possible loss of one or even two Congressional seats to fast—growing states like Texas and Utah.

Rather than address the root causes of the state's population stragnation (high housing costs, and other impediments to child—rearing by middle class families), the state is preparing to launch a research effort aimed at generating a bigger count, and possibly disputing a future census count, according to this Boston Globe report.

With millions of dollars in federal funds at stake, state lawmakers have set aside $100,000 to make sure that immigrants, students, and low—wage earners are counted in the next US Census. [....]

Mayor Thomas M. Menino said yesterday that the funding will allow the state to come up with its own population numbers and not have to rely on federal figures.

``I endorse this move by the Legislature wholeheartedly, " Menino said. ``If the numbers the Census Bureau gives us continue, there's a good chance we'll lose a congressional seat. Their numbers also jeopardize our chances of receiving our fair share of federal funds. We haven't had any way to validate the numbers. This will give us an accurate count."

Ed Lasky   7 5 06