Letter to the editor

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The article "On Fanatics, Religion, and Islam" is excellent, but contains a sentence that needs some clarifying response.

"Another Christian sect, despite Jesus' words on the comparative unimportance of the sabbath, seems to believe that salvation is determined by whether one goes to church on Saturday or Sunday."

Bless you for that word "seems," for it indicates some small wedge of uncertainty.   As a Seventh—day Adventist, let me assure you that, to us, salvation is in the Blood of the Lord Jesus Christ alone.  We do insist that there really are Ten Commandments, though, (not nine and a half, with the fourth one downgraded to a relatively unimportant suggestion).  Christ's words that you cite indicate to us that He wanted to expand people's ideas of how to keep the Sabbath, and claimed authority for that lesson based on His Lordship over everying, including that day as a memorial of Creation itself.  If you read His saying to mean "Keep any day you like, any way you like, or not at all" then we must agree to disagree, but that difference of reading neither makes us fanatics nor you a heretic.  Let us join in approaching the Scriptures with reverent attention, praying for each other, and regarding ourselves as brothers and sisters in Christ. 

Jan Charles Haluska

Professor of English

Southern Adventist University

The article "On Fanatics, Religion, and Islam" is excellent, but contains a sentence that needs some clarifying response.

"Another Christian sect, despite Jesus' words on the comparative unimportance of the sabbath, seems to believe that salvation is determined by whether one goes to church on Saturday or Sunday."

Bless you for that word "seems," for it indicates some small wedge of uncertainty.   As a Seventh—day Adventist, let me assure you that, to us, salvation is in the Blood of the Lord Jesus Christ alone.  We do insist that there really are Ten Commandments, though, (not nine and a half, with the fourth one downgraded to a relatively unimportant suggestion).  Christ's words that you cite indicate to us that He wanted to expand people's ideas of how to keep the Sabbath, and claimed authority for that lesson based on His Lordship over everying, including that day as a memorial of Creation itself.  If you read His saying to mean "Keep any day you like, any way you like, or not at all" then we must agree to disagree, but that difference of reading neither makes us fanatics nor you a heretic.  Let us join in approaching the Scriptures with reverent attention, praying for each other, and regarding ourselves as brothers and sisters in Christ. 

Jan Charles Haluska

Professor of English

Southern Adventist University