Floggin the carbon tax dead horse

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The Washington Post's Sebastian Mallaby is on his second installment of his carbon dioxide tax scheme. This time he resorts to that old standby logical fallacy "appeal to authority" citing renowned Silicon Valley tech tycoon Vinod Khosla to make his specious argument.
 
Mallaby suggests that an actual tax won't fly so he uses Khosla's stature to disguise the real agenda. In an attempt to make his point, Mallaby tells us Khosla has invested in ethanol production. He calls it next generation technology to give the impression that it is especially cutting edge. 

Mallaby should probably take some time off. This column is tired and exhausted. After sanctifying this modern day digital deity he tells us that Khosla's is now haunting the halls of Congress looking for a handout for his new venture.The only redeeming part of this whole puff piece is the name dropping at the end where he laments that no serious people are contemplating his tax scheme.

Christopher Alleva   7 25 06

The Washington Post's Sebastian Mallaby is on his second installment of his carbon dioxide tax scheme. This time he resorts to that old standby logical fallacy "appeal to authority" citing renowned Silicon Valley tech tycoon Vinod Khosla to make his specious argument.
 
Mallaby suggests that an actual tax won't fly so he uses Khosla's stature to disguise the real agenda. In an attempt to make his point, Mallaby tells us Khosla has invested in ethanol production. He calls it next generation technology to give the impression that it is especially cutting edge. 

Mallaby should probably take some time off. This column is tired and exhausted. After sanctifying this modern day digital deity he tells us that Khosla's is now haunting the halls of Congress looking for a handout for his new venture.The only redeeming part of this whole puff piece is the name dropping at the end where he laments that no serious people are contemplating his tax scheme.

Christopher Alleva   7 25 06