Did Gitmo detainee lawyers help plan mass suicide?

By

Buried in the New York Times (but at least it showed up there) is information suggesting that lawyers for the Gitmo detainess may have helped them to coordinate suicides, resulting in a worldwide firestorm over alleged abuse of the poor darlings. Such assistance would be a major abuse of attorney—client privilege, if it could be proved in court

Another set of notes marked privileged and "potentially authored by at least two of the deceased detainees" were found in the cell of a living detainee, according to court documents. One detainee also used envelopes marked attorney—client that were found to hold government documents that investigators said might have been classified.

Because all three of the men who died had never been visited by attorneys, government lawyers said the evidence "indicated the passing of materials and messages between detainees and that some level of planning or coordination of the suicides had taken place."

In an affidavit, Admiral Harris said the evidence suggested that "the suicides may have been part of a larger plan or pact for more suicides that day or in the immediate future."

He also raised the possibility that detainees' lawyers or others might have played a role in passing the notes, asking investigators to search for evidence of a plot assisted by "third parties."

Ed Lasky  7 10 06

Buried in the New York Times (but at least it showed up there) is information suggesting that lawyers for the Gitmo detainess may have helped them to coordinate suicides, resulting in a worldwide firestorm over alleged abuse of the poor darlings. Such assistance would be a major abuse of attorney—client privilege, if it could be proved in court

Another set of notes marked privileged and "potentially authored by at least two of the deceased detainees" were found in the cell of a living detainee, according to court documents. One detainee also used envelopes marked attorney—client that were found to hold government documents that investigators said might have been classified.

Because all three of the men who died had never been visited by attorneys, government lawyers said the evidence "indicated the passing of materials and messages between detainees and that some level of planning or coordination of the suicides had taken place."

In an affidavit, Admiral Harris said the evidence suggested that "the suicides may have been part of a larger plan or pact for more suicides that day or in the immediate future."

He also raised the possibility that detainees' lawyers or others might have played a role in passing the notes, asking investigators to search for evidence of a plot assisted by "third parties."

Ed Lasky  7 10 06