AP bias watch

The Associated Press interprets the House vote (410—8 in favor of supporting Israel against Hezbollah) as a result of its fear that the pro—Israel lobby will retaliate against those who dissent:

"So strong was the momentum for the resolution that it was steamrolling efforts by a small group of House members who argued that Congress's pro—Israel stance goes too far..."

Arab—American House members were explicit about blaming AIPAC for the vote:

"I'm just sick in the stomach, to put it mildly," said Rep. Nick J. Rahall II, D—W.Va., who is of Lebanese descent.

Rahall joined other Arab—American lawmakers in drafting an alternative resolution that would have omitted language holding Lebanon responsible for Hezbollah's actions and called for restraint from all sides. Rahall said that proposal was "politely swept under the rug," a political reality he and others say reflects the influence Israel has in Congress.

"There's a lot (of lawmakers) that don't feel it's right ... but vote yes, and get it the heck out of here," Rahall said.

Rep. Darrell Issa, R—Calif., who co—sponsored the alternative resolution and also is of Lebanese descent, agreed. The American Israel Public Affairs Committee lobby "throws in language that AIPAC wants. That isn't always the best thing for this body to endorse," Issa said.

Hat tip: Max G.

Thomas Lifson   7 20 06

The Associated Press interprets the House vote (410—8 in favor of supporting Israel against Hezbollah) as a result of its fear that the pro—Israel lobby will retaliate against those who dissent:

"So strong was the momentum for the resolution that it was steamrolling efforts by a small group of House members who argued that Congress's pro—Israel stance goes too far..."

Arab—American House members were explicit about blaming AIPAC for the vote:

"I'm just sick in the stomach, to put it mildly," said Rep. Nick J. Rahall II, D—W.Va., who is of Lebanese descent.

Rahall joined other Arab—American lawmakers in drafting an alternative resolution that would have omitted language holding Lebanon responsible for Hezbollah's actions and called for restraint from all sides. Rahall said that proposal was "politely swept under the rug," a political reality he and others say reflects the influence Israel has in Congress.

"There's a lot (of lawmakers) that don't feel it's right ... but vote yes, and get it the heck out of here," Rahall said.

Rep. Darrell Issa, R—Calif., who co—sponsored the alternative resolution and also is of Lebanese descent, agreed. The American Israel Public Affairs Committee lobby "throws in language that AIPAC wants. That isn't always the best thing for this body to endorse," Issa said.

Hat tip: Max G.

Thomas Lifson   7 20 06