WMDs still in Iraq?

By

Sean Osborne, Associate Director and Senior Analyst at the Northeast Intelligence Network relays a stunning report on the frustrations of retired Air Force Office of Special Investigations (AFOSI) agent Paul 'Dave' Gaubatz.  According to Gaubatz he has had a three year battle in trying to get the Iraqi Survey Group (ISG) or any other appropriate agency to investigate four sites in Iraq suspected of having biological and chemical weapons.

Gaubatz, a 20 year active duty veteran, was also a specially trained US Federal counter—intelligence agent and Arabic linguist.  In April of 2003 he was sent to Iraq and while there,

...had identified (with other Federal Agents) 4 sites that were highly suspected of containing biological and/or chemical weapons.  The sites were identified by very credible Iraqis who had knowledge and access to the areas.  They risked their lives to provide intelligence about the sites and to take U.S. personnel to the locations.  The sites would require heavy equipment to exploit the sites.  The material was alleged to be buried deep and under water.  To this date the sites have not been inspected.

I first spoke publicly about the WMD sites never being searched only after the Iraq Survey Group (ISG) and the White House announced in late 2004 that the search for WMD was over.

Over two years ago, I wrote this article for AT about the flawed search procedures used by the ISG, and about the ISG's habit of contradicting or downplaying chemical weapons caches found by trained Coalition forces.  Now, Agent Gaubitz has reinforced my suspicions of an agency seemingly unable, or more than likely, unwilling to find evidence of Saddam's WMD stockpile.

According to Gaubitz' timeline, he deployed as a civilian agent to the Air Force Office of Special Investigations (OSI) first into Saudi Arabia and then Nasiriyah, Iraq (Tallil Air base) from January to July 2003.  He had two primary missions: Counter—terrorism and locating WMD.  In April through July 2003, he and five other federal agents identified four suspected WMD sites in southern Iraq.  He made numerous attempts to ISG to get the sites exploited. 

To date (5 May 2006) this has not happened.  Since that time, he stayed in contact with U.S. Government personnel and Iraqis who had reported the original WMD sites.

In recent months, he contacted Representative Pete Hoekstra and has held meetings with Congressman Curt Weldon.  At this point he notes the process became very 'political' in that Weldon

...did not want to inform any member of the DOD because he did not trust them.  Congressman Hoekstra told him he shouldn't say that.  The Congressmen told me they did not want to inform any member of the Democratic Party because if we get to the sites and they have been exploited by insurgents/terrorists during the last 3 years, it would be very embarrassing to them and President Bush.  Congressmen Weldon stated if we go to Iraq and locate the WMD it would help with the upcoming elections.

Gaubitz also maintains that Sharon Behn of the Washington Times interviewed him several times via phone and emails about the WMD sites and obtaining background information about the Air Force Office of Special Investigations (OSI) 'losing' all of the reports submitted by Gaubitz and the other Agents assigned to Tallil Air Base Nasiriyah, Iraq.  Later, he was informed by Behn that she was not going to publish the article despite (in Gaubitz' view) the facts having been corroborated.  His belief is that the article had been 'squashed.'

I have no further insight into Gaubitz' meetings with the Congressmen, or his interviews with Sharon Behn.  I can say his frustrations with the ISG are remarkably similar to my experiences with them in the summer of 2003.  Amazingly, the case is still not closed on Saddam's WMD.  Only now, it's possible that terrorists may have possession of WMD at the sites that we willingly chose not to exploit and secure.

Hat Tip: Dr. Mohamed Ibn Guadi

Doug Hanson  06—04—06

Sean Osborne, Associate Director and Senior Analyst at the Northeast Intelligence Network relays a stunning report on the frustrations of retired Air Force Office of Special Investigations (AFOSI) agent Paul 'Dave' Gaubatz.  According to Gaubatz he has had a three year battle in trying to get the Iraqi Survey Group (ISG) or any other appropriate agency to investigate four sites in Iraq suspected of having biological and chemical weapons.

Gaubatz, a 20 year active duty veteran, was also a specially trained US Federal counter—intelligence agent and Arabic linguist.  In April of 2003 he was sent to Iraq and while there,

...had identified (with other Federal Agents) 4 sites that were highly suspected of containing biological and/or chemical weapons.  The sites were identified by very credible Iraqis who had knowledge and access to the areas.  They risked their lives to provide intelligence about the sites and to take U.S. personnel to the locations.  The sites would require heavy equipment to exploit the sites.  The material was alleged to be buried deep and under water.  To this date the sites have not been inspected.

I first spoke publicly about the WMD sites never being searched only after the Iraq Survey Group (ISG) and the White House announced in late 2004 that the search for WMD was over.

Over two years ago, I wrote this article for AT about the flawed search procedures used by the ISG, and about the ISG's habit of contradicting or downplaying chemical weapons caches found by trained Coalition forces.  Now, Agent Gaubitz has reinforced my suspicions of an agency seemingly unable, or more than likely, unwilling to find evidence of Saddam's WMD stockpile.

According to Gaubitz' timeline, he deployed as a civilian agent to the Air Force Office of Special Investigations (OSI) first into Saudi Arabia and then Nasiriyah, Iraq (Tallil Air base) from January to July 2003.  He had two primary missions: Counter—terrorism and locating WMD.  In April through July 2003, he and five other federal agents identified four suspected WMD sites in southern Iraq.  He made numerous attempts to ISG to get the sites exploited. 

To date (5 May 2006) this has not happened.  Since that time, he stayed in contact with U.S. Government personnel and Iraqis who had reported the original WMD sites.

In recent months, he contacted Representative Pete Hoekstra and has held meetings with Congressman Curt Weldon.  At this point he notes the process became very 'political' in that Weldon

...did not want to inform any member of the DOD because he did not trust them.  Congressman Hoekstra told him he shouldn't say that.  The Congressmen told me they did not want to inform any member of the Democratic Party because if we get to the sites and they have been exploited by insurgents/terrorists during the last 3 years, it would be very embarrassing to them and President Bush.  Congressmen Weldon stated if we go to Iraq and locate the WMD it would help with the upcoming elections.

Gaubitz also maintains that Sharon Behn of the Washington Times interviewed him several times via phone and emails about the WMD sites and obtaining background information about the Air Force Office of Special Investigations (OSI) 'losing' all of the reports submitted by Gaubitz and the other Agents assigned to Tallil Air Base Nasiriyah, Iraq.  Later, he was informed by Behn that she was not going to publish the article despite (in Gaubitz' view) the facts having been corroborated.  His belief is that the article had been 'squashed.'

I have no further insight into Gaubitz' meetings with the Congressmen, or his interviews with Sharon Behn.  I can say his frustrations with the ISG are remarkably similar to my experiences with them in the summer of 2003.  Amazingly, the case is still not closed on Saddam's WMD.  Only now, it's possible that terrorists may have possession of WMD at the sites that we willingly chose not to exploit and secure.

Hat Tip: Dr. Mohamed Ibn Guadi

Doug Hanson  06—04—06