Multiculturalism and Muslim leadership

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A couple of weeks ago, British security forces raided a house in east London on the suspicion that it contained a chemical weapons lab. During the operation — which involved around 250 personnel some of whom wore chemical suits — a young Arab male was shot in the shoulder. His injuries were not life—threatening and he was released within a few days. The police did not find chemical weapons, however, and it now appears that they acted on a flawed tip.

Ever since then, the British Muslim community has been up in arms complaining about police practices and demanding apologies not only from the Police Commissioner but also from the Prime Minister himself. They have even issued thinly—veiled threats of violence. One of their leaders, Muhammad Abdul Bari, the secretary general of the Muslim Council of Britain, said this:

Angry people can do anything. Angry people can even feel that they should take the law into their own hands, so anger has to be directed into positive action.

It must be remembered that this community has produced the terrorists who unleashed the carnage in the London subway less than one year ago. Even as we speak, there is a trial underway of seven Muslims charged with planning terrorist acts ranging from poisoning the water supply to crashing a British Airways airliner. Needless to say, there are others in their ranks who would like to commit such or worse atrocities.

That Muslim leaders have the gall to intimidate in this fashion shows how convoluted things have become. Although one may be tempted to feel angry, it is important to realize that ultimately it is not their fault. The blame rests with our domestic multiculturalists. It is their policies that have brought about the situation where a terrorist—breeding community can freely condemn those who try to stop its members from setting off mayhem. A critical time has been reached when an all—out effort must be made to reverse the policies that have led to this state of affairs. If we fail to roll them back, we cannot but come to grief.

Vasko Kohlmayer   6 19 08

A couple of weeks ago, British security forces raided a house in east London on the suspicion that it contained a chemical weapons lab. During the operation — which involved around 250 personnel some of whom wore chemical suits — a young Arab male was shot in the shoulder. His injuries were not life—threatening and he was released within a few days. The police did not find chemical weapons, however, and it now appears that they acted on a flawed tip.

Ever since then, the British Muslim community has been up in arms complaining about police practices and demanding apologies not only from the Police Commissioner but also from the Prime Minister himself. They have even issued thinly—veiled threats of violence. One of their leaders, Muhammad Abdul Bari, the secretary general of the Muslim Council of Britain, said this:

Angry people can do anything. Angry people can even feel that they should take the law into their own hands, so anger has to be directed into positive action.

It must be remembered that this community has produced the terrorists who unleashed the carnage in the London subway less than one year ago. Even as we speak, there is a trial underway of seven Muslims charged with planning terrorist acts ranging from poisoning the water supply to crashing a British Airways airliner. Needless to say, there are others in their ranks who would like to commit such or worse atrocities.

That Muslim leaders have the gall to intimidate in this fashion shows how convoluted things have become. Although one may be tempted to feel angry, it is important to realize that ultimately it is not their fault. The blame rests with our domestic multiculturalists. It is their policies that have brought about the situation where a terrorist—breeding community can freely condemn those who try to stop its members from setting off mayhem. A critical time has been reached when an all—out effort must be made to reverse the policies that have led to this state of affairs. If we fail to roll them back, we cannot but come to grief.

Vasko Kohlmayer   6 19 08