Jersey girls prove Coulter's point

The reaction to Ann Coulter's Jersey Girls reference in her new book, Godless, The Church of Liberalism, proves the point she was making.  You cannot be critical of, or in any way respond to the leftist message that comes from someone classified as victim.

Think of Christopher Reeve and Cindy Sheehan.  These people were used by liberals/Democrats to get a message out that could not be challenged by the Right for fear of demonization. Reeve, because he was paralyzed, carried the water on embryonic stem cell research; Sheehan, because her soldier son died in the Iraqi war, carried the bucket with the  'withdraw the troops' message.

Truth is, the Jersey Girls were termed 'rock stars of grief,' back in 2004.  Not by Ann Coulter, but by another member of the 9/11 families, who had encountered the women on more than one occasion and, of course, watched their actions closely.  It was Debra Burlingame, whose brother was a pilot on one of the hijacked flights, who made this astute observation. 

So, the reaction we're now seeing to the chapter in Coulter's book that deals with this victim—as—messenger phenomenon, once again, proves her point. 

J. James Estrada   6 8 06

The reaction to Ann Coulter's Jersey Girls reference in her new book, Godless, The Church of Liberalism, proves the point she was making.  You cannot be critical of, or in any way respond to the leftist message that comes from someone classified as victim.

Think of Christopher Reeve and Cindy Sheehan.  These people were used by liberals/Democrats to get a message out that could not be challenged by the Right for fear of demonization. Reeve, because he was paralyzed, carried the water on embryonic stem cell research; Sheehan, because her soldier son died in the Iraqi war, carried the bucket with the  'withdraw the troops' message.

Truth is, the Jersey Girls were termed 'rock stars of grief,' back in 2004.  Not by Ann Coulter, but by another member of the 9/11 families, who had encountered the women on more than one occasion and, of course, watched their actions closely.  It was Debra Burlingame, whose brother was a pilot on one of the hijacked flights, who made this astute observation. 

So, the reaction we're now seeing to the chapter in Coulter's book that deals with this victim—as—messenger phenomenon, once again, proves her point. 

J. James Estrada   6 8 06