Iran death judge lands on UN Human Rights Council

Here's an opportunity for Human Rights Watch and other NGOs to take a stand in defense of human rights. I am not holding my breath. Eil Lake of the New York Sun reports:

Iran's delegation to the U.N. Human Rights Council faces being isolated by the envoys of free nations this week after it emerged that its leader is one of Iran's most notorious censors and prosecutors of dissidents who the Canadians hold responsible for acquitting those who raped and murdered one of their female citizens.

The infamous Saeed Mortazavi this week led Iran's delegation in Geneva to the first session of the United Nation's newly reconfigured human rights panel on Monday, even though Iran is not a member of that panel. Mr. Mortazavi is accused by the Canadian government of playing a role in the rape and murder of a woman journalist and photographer, is credited with closing more than 100 newspapers, and was responsible not only for jailing the students who led the July 9, 1999, pro—democracy demonstrations in Tehran but of clearing the security officials accused of torturing them.

To top it off, he is the lead prosecutor in the regime's legal efforts against the Iranian dissident leader, Akbar Ganji.

Ed Lasky   6 22 06

Here's an opportunity for Human Rights Watch and other NGOs to take a stand in defense of human rights. I am not holding my breath. Eil Lake of the New York Sun reports:

Iran's delegation to the U.N. Human Rights Council faces being isolated by the envoys of free nations this week after it emerged that its leader is one of Iran's most notorious censors and prosecutors of dissidents who the Canadians hold responsible for acquitting those who raped and murdered one of their female citizens.

The infamous Saeed Mortazavi this week led Iran's delegation in Geneva to the first session of the United Nation's newly reconfigured human rights panel on Monday, even though Iran is not a member of that panel. Mr. Mortazavi is accused by the Canadian government of playing a role in the rape and murder of a woman journalist and photographer, is credited with closing more than 100 newspapers, and was responsible not only for jailing the students who led the July 9, 1999, pro—democracy demonstrations in Tehran but of clearing the security officials accused of torturing them.

To top it off, he is the lead prosecutor in the regime's legal efforts against the Iranian dissident leader, Akbar Ganji.

Ed Lasky   6 22 06