France cracks down in immigration

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The French, led by Nicholas Sarkozy (who may well be the next President), are engaged in a crackdown on undocumented aliens, known as sans papiers, French (perhaps evoking memories of the sans coulottes of the French Revolution?). As in this country, the left is standing up for those who flout the law. The UK Financial Times reports:

About 100 illegal immigrants queued on Friday outside the Luxembourg Palace, home to the French Senate in the heart of Paris's left bank, under the watchful eye of several policemen.

Many of the so—called sans—papiers looked nervous. But they need not have worried, as the police had no intention of arresting or deporting them. Or, at least, not yet.

Instead, the immigrants — mostly from Asia, Europe and Africa, such as Baouz Sehrine from Algeria — were granted entry to the upper house of parliament as guests of a group of leftwing senators protesting over Friday's approval of a contentious immigration bill.

Their protest is part of an intensifying wave of civil and political disobedience spreading across France against the government crackdown on immigration led by Nicolas Sarkozy, the tough—talking interior minister.

Mr Sarkozy sparked the latest controversy by ordering hundreds of thousands of illegal immigrants — estimates of their number range from 200,000 and 400,000 — to be deported, along with their children once the school term ends in early July.

Notice that nobody in authority in the United States government is demanding mass deportations, or even talking of such. But then, we have not had cars burning in the street. Yet.

Hat tip: Joe Crowley

Thomas Lifson   6 17 06

The French, led by Nicholas Sarkozy (who may well be the next President), are engaged in a crackdown on undocumented aliens, known as sans papiers, French (perhaps evoking memories of the sans coulottes of the French Revolution?). As in this country, the left is standing up for those who flout the law. The UK Financial Times reports:

About 100 illegal immigrants queued on Friday outside the Luxembourg Palace, home to the French Senate in the heart of Paris's left bank, under the watchful eye of several policemen.

Many of the so—called sans—papiers looked nervous. But they need not have worried, as the police had no intention of arresting or deporting them. Or, at least, not yet.

Instead, the immigrants — mostly from Asia, Europe and Africa, such as Baouz Sehrine from Algeria — were granted entry to the upper house of parliament as guests of a group of leftwing senators protesting over Friday's approval of a contentious immigration bill.

Their protest is part of an intensifying wave of civil and political disobedience spreading across France against the government crackdown on immigration led by Nicolas Sarkozy, the tough—talking interior minister.

Mr Sarkozy sparked the latest controversy by ordering hundreds of thousands of illegal immigrants — estimates of their number range from 200,000 and 400,000 — to be deported, along with their children once the school term ends in early July.

Notice that nobody in authority in the United States government is demanding mass deportations, or even talking of such. But then, we have not had cars burning in the street. Yet.

Hat tip: Joe Crowley

Thomas Lifson   6 17 06