Death from above: hellfire from the heavens strikes Zarqawi

Abu Musab Zarqawi is dead, courtesy of the United States Military. A man who personally beheaded hostages in the name of Allah, experienced hellfire from the heavens, as precision—guided ordnance destroyed the safe house in which he found temporary shelter. His instantaneous death deprived him of the opportunity to contemplate the ironies. It is not so much a glorious martyrdom as an ignominious betrayal. General Casey averred

"Tips and intelligence from Iraqi senior leaders from his network led forces to al—Zarqawi and some of his associates who were conducting a meeting . . . when the air strike was launched."

Credit was carefully shared with Iraqi forces, though the firepower was most definitely American. Both Iraqi civillians and Coalition forces in Iraq can take comfort that a shift in momentum has taken place, with al Qaeda in Iraq being seen as the "weak horse" in Usama bin Laden's memorable phrase.

If Zarqawi's former colleagues have any operations planned, they will no doubt accelerate their implementation, as if to demonstrate their staying power. But Zarqawi, unlike bin Laden, appears to have been a hands—on manager, so his loss is far more than symbolic. But the symbolism is important, too.

Jordan, Zarqawi's homeland, can take equal plasure in the death of the hotel bomber, who sluaghtered innocents. All in all a very good day's work. Special Forces are due tremendous credit, though, because of the nature of their work they will receive no personal atention or thanks from the public. Though we don't know exactly who they are, they have our deep gratitude. We do know what they are: resourceful, tough, intelligent, dedicated, brave, and patriotic heroes.

Chalk a big one up for the good guys.

Thomas Lifson   6 8 06

Abu Musab Zarqawi is dead, courtesy of the United States Military. A man who personally beheaded hostages in the name of Allah, experienced hellfire from the heavens, as precision—guided ordnance destroyed the safe house in which he found temporary shelter. His instantaneous death deprived him of the opportunity to contemplate the ironies. It is not so much a glorious martyrdom as an ignominious betrayal. General Casey averred

"Tips and intelligence from Iraqi senior leaders from his network led forces to al—Zarqawi and some of his associates who were conducting a meeting . . . when the air strike was launched."

Credit was carefully shared with Iraqi forces, though the firepower was most definitely American. Both Iraqi civillians and Coalition forces in Iraq can take comfort that a shift in momentum has taken place, with al Qaeda in Iraq being seen as the "weak horse" in Usama bin Laden's memorable phrase.

If Zarqawi's former colleagues have any operations planned, they will no doubt accelerate their implementation, as if to demonstrate their staying power. But Zarqawi, unlike bin Laden, appears to have been a hands—on manager, so his loss is far more than symbolic. But the symbolism is important, too.

Jordan, Zarqawi's homeland, can take equal plasure in the death of the hotel bomber, who sluaghtered innocents. All in all a very good day's work. Special Forces are due tremendous credit, though, because of the nature of their work they will receive no personal atention or thanks from the public. Though we don't know exactly who they are, they have our deep gratitude. We do know what they are: resourceful, tough, intelligent, dedicated, brave, and patriotic heroes.

Chalk a big one up for the good guys.

Thomas Lifson   6 8 06