A friend's thoughts on the flag burning amendment

Peter C. Glover is a pro—American British blogger, whose struggles with PC in the UK are an ongoing saga. An unusually thoughtful man, Peter today writes in Wires from the Bunker about his relief that the flag burning amendment failed.

I have to say I am pleased that the Senate failed (by a single vote!) to amend the constitution to outlaw flag burning. The problem is that (as annoying or even upsetting as it can be) you really are beginning to trespass onto the abstract ground of burning books and even ideas.

And where do you stop? Flags appear on t—shirts and memorabilia of all kinds. One Fox TV news commentator yesterday reminded his audience that when a flag is worn or old and needs replacing the duty of the citizenry is...you've guessed it...to burn it.

I will glady wave an American flag or stand beneath it anytime. They have stood beside us Brits and shed their blood with us often enough. But when I watch a man whose only argument is to burn the American or British flag I know that man has already lost his reason and that his argumnet is of little consequence.

The USA under wrote the freedom of the West for over 60 years in Europe. For people under the boot of tyranny worldwide it is still the global voice freedom. The Americans still have the moral strength (at least in 38 states) to carry out God's hard laws (the governing authorities being his agents for good — Romans 13:1) such as judicial execution (as here yesterday) when the liberal dominated Western elites no longer have the stomach for it.

It is possible to take flag—waving too far. Making flag burning an anti—constitution issue does exactly that. And just where does the the issue stop in a country where the flag appears fenders, bedspreads, badges et al? Let it go my friends.

Peter C. Glover is a pro—American British blogger, whose struggles with PC in the UK are an ongoing saga. An unusually thoughtful man, Peter today writes in Wires from the Bunker about his relief that the flag burning amendment failed.

I have to say I am pleased that the Senate failed (by a single vote!) to amend the constitution to outlaw flag burning. The problem is that (as annoying or even upsetting as it can be) you really are beginning to trespass onto the abstract ground of burning books and even ideas.

And where do you stop? Flags appear on t—shirts and memorabilia of all kinds. One Fox TV news commentator yesterday reminded his audience that when a flag is worn or old and needs replacing the duty of the citizenry is...you've guessed it...to burn it.

I will glady wave an American flag or stand beneath it anytime. They have stood beside us Brits and shed their blood with us often enough. But when I watch a man whose only argument is to burn the American or British flag I know that man has already lost his reason and that his argumnet is of little consequence.

The USA under wrote the freedom of the West for over 60 years in Europe. For people under the boot of tyranny worldwide it is still the global voice freedom. The Americans still have the moral strength (at least in 38 states) to carry out God's hard laws (the governing authorities being his agents for good — Romans 13:1) such as judicial execution (as here yesterday) when the liberal dominated Western elites no longer have the stomach for it.

It is possible to take flag—waving too far. Making flag burning an anti—constitution issue does exactly that. And just where does the the issue stop in a country where the flag appears fenders, bedspreads, badges et al? Let it go my friends.