The tentacles of corruption

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Never underestimate the powers of greed and corruption in international affairs and the United Nations. According to Mitchell Prothero of Fortune Magazine, The car bomb assassination of a former Prime Minister Hariri of Lebanon, which led to the expuslsion of Syrian forces, may have been linked to the collapse of Lebanon's Bank al—Madina, and ultimately to the UN the Oil for Food program and the Assad family of Syria.
some of the officials were deeply involved from the late 1990s until early 2003 in a kickback scheme that supplied them with cash, real estate, cars, and jewelry in exchange for protecting and facilitating a multibillion—dollar money laundering operation at Lebanon's Bank al—Madina that allowed terrorist organizations, peddlers of West African "blood diamonds," Saddam Hussein, and Russian gangsters to hide income and convert hot money into legitimate bank accounts around the world.

Despite efforts to cover up the details surrounding the bank's collapse in early 2003, these sources say, the Syrian and Lebanese officials allegedly involved in the fraud feared that Hariri could return to power and reveal their role in one of the biggest illegal banking operations in the Middle East since the Bank of Credit & Commerce International scandal in the early 1990s.

Ed Lasky   5 04 06
Never underestimate the powers of greed and corruption in international affairs and the United Nations. According to Mitchell Prothero of Fortune Magazine, The car bomb assassination of a former Prime Minister Hariri of Lebanon, which led to the expuslsion of Syrian forces, may have been linked to the collapse of Lebanon's Bank al—Madina, and ultimately to the UN the Oil for Food program and the Assad family of Syria.
some of the officials were deeply involved from the late 1990s until early 2003 in a kickback scheme that supplied them with cash, real estate, cars, and jewelry in exchange for protecting and facilitating a multibillion—dollar money laundering operation at Lebanon's Bank al—Madina that allowed terrorist organizations, peddlers of West African "blood diamonds," Saddam Hussein, and Russian gangsters to hide income and convert hot money into legitimate bank accounts around the world.

Despite efforts to cover up the details surrounding the bank's collapse in early 2003, these sources say, the Syrian and Lebanese officials allegedly involved in the fraud feared that Hariri could return to power and reveal their role in one of the biggest illegal banking operations in the Middle East since the Bank of Credit & Commerce International scandal in the early 1990s.

Ed Lasky   5 04 06