Speaking truth to pettiness

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Australia's Prime Minister John Howard does not join the chorus of anti—Americanism common to West European elites, disappointed at their eclipse in power and wealth. He has lead Australia into close alliance with the United States because he believes what he says. From The Age of Melbourne.

"Without American leadership, the trials and tragedies of recent years could be but a prelude of darker days to come," Mr Howard said in an address yesterday to the Chicago Council on Foreign Relations. "With American leadership, we can build a better world — not just for us, but for all." [....]

"To the voices of anti—Americanism around the world, to those who shout 'Yankee go home', let me offer some quiet advice: be careful what you wish for."

Addressing specific global challenges, Mr Howard:

■ Reaffirmed the commitment to match the resolve of the US in Iraq. "Australia is with you. We will stay the course. We will finish the job," he said.

■ Described Iran's refusal to back down on its pursuit of uranium enrichment as a challenge for the United Nations.

■ Predicted that the emergence of a global middle class, particularly in China and India, would be one of the most momentous trends of the 21st century.

■ Defined China's rise as the defining phenomenon of the age.

■ Praised Indonesian President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono, saying he was tackling the enormous challenges facing Indonesia robustly and admirably.

Mr Howard also said none of the problems in the Asia—Pacific region — including in the Taiwan Strait and on the Korean Peninsula — could be resolved, or even managed, without US leadership and engagement.

Richard Baehr   5 18 06

Australia's Prime Minister John Howard does not join the chorus of anti—Americanism common to West European elites, disappointed at their eclipse in power and wealth. He has lead Australia into close alliance with the United States because he believes what he says. From The Age of Melbourne.

"Without American leadership, the trials and tragedies of recent years could be but a prelude of darker days to come," Mr Howard said in an address yesterday to the Chicago Council on Foreign Relations. "With American leadership, we can build a better world — not just for us, but for all." [....]

"To the voices of anti—Americanism around the world, to those who shout 'Yankee go home', let me offer some quiet advice: be careful what you wish for."

Addressing specific global challenges, Mr Howard:

■ Reaffirmed the commitment to match the resolve of the US in Iraq. "Australia is with you. We will stay the course. We will finish the job," he said.

■ Described Iran's refusal to back down on its pursuit of uranium enrichment as a challenge for the United Nations.

■ Predicted that the emergence of a global middle class, particularly in China and India, would be one of the most momentous trends of the 21st century.

■ Defined China's rise as the defining phenomenon of the age.

■ Praised Indonesian President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono, saying he was tackling the enormous challenges facing Indonesia robustly and admirably.

Mr Howard also said none of the problems in the Asia—Pacific region — including in the Taiwan Strait and on the Korean Peninsula — could be resolved, or even managed, without US leadership and engagement.

Richard Baehr   5 18 06