Instant Pharaonic Fatwa

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Here's an update to the ongoing series tracking the eastern—hemispheric, multi—culti effort to erase all vestiges of humanity's ancient past. From BBC News, Cairo, we learn that 'Egyptians look to Islam for answers.' And just what was the question?

A religious ruling condemning the display of statues has angered Egyptian liberals and intellectuals who fear it could encourage religious zealots to attack the country's pharaonic heritage.

The ruling was issued by the Mufti, the most senior religious scholar in Egypt.

Islam has always been wary of representations of the human figure.

Anything which could even remotely suggest idolatry is frowned upon.

Any thoughts on where this is going? Think giant Buddha statues. The irony of all this is that modern communications technology is being used to promote this biblical, sorry, koranic concept of idolatry:

Islam Online

Fatwas are proliferating in the newspapers, on the internet and on satellite channels.

Islam Online is a phenomenally successful website which aims to present a comprehensive view of Islam to the world.

It runs a very popular fatwa section.

"We have a section called 'Ask a scholar' where you can find different fatwas on issues from laser surgery to correct eyesight down to April Fools Day," said Sayed Mohamed Amin, an editor on Islam Online.

Fatwas at the speed of light. Einstein could have never guessed.

Dennis Sevakis   5 10 06

Here's an update to the ongoing series tracking the eastern—hemispheric, multi—culti effort to erase all vestiges of humanity's ancient past. From BBC News, Cairo, we learn that 'Egyptians look to Islam for answers.' And just what was the question?

A religious ruling condemning the display of statues has angered Egyptian liberals and intellectuals who fear it could encourage religious zealots to attack the country's pharaonic heritage.

The ruling was issued by the Mufti, the most senior religious scholar in Egypt.

Islam has always been wary of representations of the human figure.

Anything which could even remotely suggest idolatry is frowned upon.

Any thoughts on where this is going? Think giant Buddha statues. The irony of all this is that modern communications technology is being used to promote this biblical, sorry, koranic concept of idolatry:

Islam Online

Fatwas are proliferating in the newspapers, on the internet and on satellite channels.

Islam Online is a phenomenally successful website which aims to present a comprehensive view of Islam to the world.

It runs a very popular fatwa section.

"We have a section called 'Ask a scholar' where you can find different fatwas on issues from laser surgery to correct eyesight down to April Fools Day," said Sayed Mohamed Amin, an editor on Islam Online.

Fatwas at the speed of light. Einstein could have never guessed.

Dennis Sevakis   5 10 06