Fatah members seeks asylum (in Spain) from Hamas

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One group of terror supporters is seeking asylum from other terror groups in a Western European nation. You gotta like that!! Luke Baker of Reuters reports:

Staring idly across the hills of the northern West Bank, toward the plains of Israel, Mohammed Zaghal and his friends have no doubt about where they would rather be: Spain.

Having earned almost nothing for the past six years and with little prospect of getting jobs in Zabouba, a village near Jenin where unemployment tops 60 percent, they are desperate to follow friends who have fled to Europe.

Since the Islamic group Hamas won Palestinian elections in January —— a move that drew the wrath of Israel, Europe and the United States and led to an economic blockade —— the number seeking to escape has risen sharply, locals say.

"Everyone in town, everyone in Jenin, just wants to get out," says Zaghal, 24, who used to work in Israel until a Palestinian uprising began and Israel built a barrier through the West Bank, penning him into Zabouba.
 
"In Europe we can move freely, there are jobs, there is money that we can send back to our families," he said.  "Here I have no hope, I sit at home and get bored all day."  Looking at Jenin and its surrounding villages, it is easy to see why young men want to leave.  Many buildings are merely rubble, the result of days of fighting when Israeli forces reoccupied the town in 2002.

Ed Lasky   5 26 06

One group of terror supporters is seeking asylum from other terror groups in a Western European nation. You gotta like that!! Luke Baker of Reuters reports:

Staring idly across the hills of the northern West Bank, toward the plains of Israel, Mohammed Zaghal and his friends have no doubt about where they would rather be: Spain.

Having earned almost nothing for the past six years and with little prospect of getting jobs in Zabouba, a village near Jenin where unemployment tops 60 percent, they are desperate to follow friends who have fled to Europe.

Since the Islamic group Hamas won Palestinian elections in January —— a move that drew the wrath of Israel, Europe and the United States and led to an economic blockade —— the number seeking to escape has risen sharply, locals say.

"Everyone in town, everyone in Jenin, just wants to get out," says Zaghal, 24, who used to work in Israel until a Palestinian uprising began and Israel built a barrier through the West Bank, penning him into Zabouba.
 
"In Europe we can move freely, there are jobs, there is money that we can send back to our families," he said.  "Here I have no hope, I sit at home and get bored all day."  Looking at Jenin and its surrounding villages, it is easy to see why young men want to leave.  Many buildings are merely rubble, the result of days of fighting when Israeli forces reoccupied the town in 2002.

Ed Lasky   5 26 06