A Day Without Gringos

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Right across our southern border, Mexicans joined in the spirit of the May Day and its American march for illegal immigrant "rights."  And, dear reader, before you get too excited that Mexicans feel that US citizens who move there from  bringing wealth and jobs should have rights and protection under Mexican law know that the march was racially labeled A Day Without Gringos and supported the rights of Mexicans to pour unhindered into the US.  Bravely matching deeds to words, a few even suffered extreme hardship by boycotting Mexico's and South America's Wal Marts and McDonalds.

A day—long protest dubbed "A Day Without Gringos" drew thousands of Mexicans into the streets on Monday and kept many away from U.S.—owned supermarkets and fast—food restaurants to support rallies in the United States demanding immigration reform.

Some Mexicans said staying away from U.S. businesses was tough, and customers streamed into some branches of Wal—Mart, McDonald's and Burger King in Mexico City.

Wal—Mart shopper Juan Ortiz, a 28—year—old salesman, said he supported legalizing migrants, but didn't think it was practical to boycott U.S. goods. "You have to buy what is least expensive here, and I have to buy things for my family," he said.

In the border city of Tijuana, across from San Diego, Calif., about 400 boycott supporters blocked half the access lanes to an international bridge to discourage Mexicans from crossing into the United States to shop.

However the boycott was a total failure, as not one south of the border citizen rejected the almighty US gringo $ either from illegal aliens' workers' remittances or US aid or even from salaries of US owned factories and businesses.  Ah what a shame! 
 
Ethel C. Fenig   5 02 06

Right across our southern border, Mexicans joined in the spirit of the May Day and its American march for illegal immigrant "rights."  And, dear reader, before you get too excited that Mexicans feel that US citizens who move there from  bringing wealth and jobs should have rights and protection under Mexican law know that the march was racially labeled A Day Without Gringos and supported the rights of Mexicans to pour unhindered into the US.  Bravely matching deeds to words, a few even suffered extreme hardship by boycotting Mexico's and South America's Wal Marts and McDonalds.

A day—long protest dubbed "A Day Without Gringos" drew thousands of Mexicans into the streets on Monday and kept many away from U.S.—owned supermarkets and fast—food restaurants to support rallies in the United States demanding immigration reform.

Some Mexicans said staying away from U.S. businesses was tough, and customers streamed into some branches of Wal—Mart, McDonald's and Burger King in Mexico City.

Wal—Mart shopper Juan Ortiz, a 28—year—old salesman, said he supported legalizing migrants, but didn't think it was practical to boycott U.S. goods. "You have to buy what is least expensive here, and I have to buy things for my family," he said.

In the border city of Tijuana, across from San Diego, Calif., about 400 boycott supporters blocked half the access lanes to an international bridge to discourage Mexicans from crossing into the United States to shop.

However the boycott was a total failure, as not one south of the border citizen rejected the almighty US gringo $ either from illegal aliens' workers' remittances or US aid or even from salaries of US owned factories and businesses.  Ah what a shame! 
 
Ethel C. Fenig   5 02 06