The old media double standard

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A Congressman is alleged to have committed  250 ethics violations. Big news? Only if he is a Republican. Have you seen the following in the New York Times? From CNS News:

 U.S. Rep. Alan Mollohan (D—W.Va.) has committed over 250 violations of House ethics rules, according to a conservative legal watchdog group.

The National Legal and Policy Center (NLPC) filed a complaint with the U.S. attorney for the District of Columbia on Feb. 28, alleging that Mollohan failed to disclose and grossly underreported his assets, loans and interests in certain companies.

After filing a series of Freedom of Information Act requests, NLPC stated that "slowly a picture of Mollohan's finances emerged that was sharply different from the one being portrayed in the Financial Disclosure Reports." All members of Congress are required to file the disclosure forms as part of the Ethics in Government Act.

Ken Boehm, chairman of the NLPC, said every report Mollohan filed from 1996 to 2004 had "major errors."

"The real issue here is not whether Mollohan systematically was hiding financial and real estate assets, and grossly misrepresenting their value. He was. The real issue is why he was hiding those assets," Boehm said, also pointing out that Mollohan is the ranking Democrat on the House Committee on Standards of Official Conduct —— popularly known as the ethics committee.

"No one in the House has more familiarity with the disclosure laws than he does. Any kind of excuse that he did not know how to fill out his financial disclosure reports —— for a nine—year period —— does not pass the straight face test," Boehm added.

A Congressman is alleged to have committed  250 ethics violations. Big news? Only if he is a Republican. Have you seen the following in the New York Times? From CNS News:

 U.S. Rep. Alan Mollohan (D—W.Va.) has committed over 250 violations of House ethics rules, according to a conservative legal watchdog group.

The National Legal and Policy Center (NLPC) filed a complaint with the U.S. attorney for the District of Columbia on Feb. 28, alleging that Mollohan failed to disclose and grossly underreported his assets, loans and interests in certain companies.

After filing a series of Freedom of Information Act requests, NLPC stated that "slowly a picture of Mollohan's finances emerged that was sharply different from the one being portrayed in the Financial Disclosure Reports." All members of Congress are required to file the disclosure forms as part of the Ethics in Government Act.

Ken Boehm, chairman of the NLPC, said every report Mollohan filed from 1996 to 2004 had "major errors."

"The real issue here is not whether Mollohan systematically was hiding financial and real estate assets, and grossly misrepresenting their value. He was. The real issue is why he was hiding those assets," Boehm said, also pointing out that Mollohan is the ranking Democrat on the House Committee on Standards of Official Conduct —— popularly known as the ethics committee.

"No one in the House has more familiarity with the disclosure laws than he does. Any kind of excuse that he did not know how to fill out his financial disclosure reports —— for a nine—year period —— does not pass the straight face test," Boehm added.