The Islam exception

Muslims believe, as most other religious people do, that theirs is the one true faith. Fair enough. But in today's world Muslims are the only group which demands via intimidation that their faith be treated as different and better than the others by non—believers.

This phenomenon is properly understood as the imposition of Shari'a law on dhimmis. Islam, where it rules, relegates non—believers to permanent inferior status in everything from the weight of testimony in court to taxation to housing. Bit by bit, this system is extended beyond Islamic—dominated countries into the dar al harb ("the lands of war").

This strategy is succeeding. Each success tells the jihadi warriors to try even harder, for the kufrs (infidels) are weak because their religions are false.

Comedy Central, which refused to air an image of Muhammad in its South Park series this week, lays out its terms of surrender to the jihadis in a form letter sent to viewers (hat tip: John Sanchez) who complained about the censorship:

"Cartoon Wars" contained a very important message, one that Trey
and Matt [Parker and Stone — the creators of South Park] felt strongly about, as did we at the network, which is why we gave them carte blanche in every facet but one: we would not broadcast a portrayal of Muhammad.

In that regard, did we censor the show? Yes, we did. But if you hold
Comedy Central's 15—year track record up against any other network out
there, you'll find that we afford our talent the most creative freedom
and provide a nurturing atmosphere that challenges them to be bold and
daring and places them in a position to constantly break barriers and
push the envelope. The result has been some of the most provocative
television ever produced.

Parker and Stone slyly demonstrated the hypocrisy by including images of vile things happening to Jesus. Comedy Central didn't censor them, and so far angry Christians have not been attacking anywhere I know.

Message to Osama: you've won. Keep it up!

Thomas Lifson   4 15 06

Muslims believe, as most other religious people do, that theirs is the one true faith. Fair enough. But in today's world Muslims are the only group which demands via intimidation that their faith be treated as different and better than the others by non—believers.

This phenomenon is properly understood as the imposition of Shari'a law on dhimmis. Islam, where it rules, relegates non—believers to permanent inferior status in everything from the weight of testimony in court to taxation to housing. Bit by bit, this system is extended beyond Islamic—dominated countries into the dar al harb ("the lands of war").

This strategy is succeeding. Each success tells the jihadi warriors to try even harder, for the kufrs (infidels) are weak because their religions are false.

Comedy Central, which refused to air an image of Muhammad in its South Park series this week, lays out its terms of surrender to the jihadis in a form letter sent to viewers (hat tip: John Sanchez) who complained about the censorship:

"Cartoon Wars" contained a very important message, one that Trey
and Matt [Parker and Stone — the creators of South Park] felt strongly about, as did we at the network, which is why we gave them carte blanche in every facet but one: we would not broadcast a portrayal of Muhammad.

In that regard, did we censor the show? Yes, we did. But if you hold
Comedy Central's 15—year track record up against any other network out
there, you'll find that we afford our talent the most creative freedom
and provide a nurturing atmosphere that challenges them to be bold and
daring and places them in a position to constantly break barriers and
push the envelope. The result has been some of the most provocative
television ever produced.

Parker and Stone slyly demonstrated the hypocrisy by including images of vile things happening to Jesus. Comedy Central didn't censor them, and so far angry Christians have not been attacking anywhere I know.

Message to Osama: you've won. Keep it up!

Thomas Lifson   4 15 06