Of minds great and small

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In her preface  to 'The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci,' Irma A. Richter writes:

To live close to great minds is a great education, and the happiest thing that can befall us.

The reverse is also true: Dealing with small minds degrades our own. This degradation, however, is the price we must be willing to pay for our survival. It is a sad reality that our continued existence depends on our willingness to engage liberals whose minds are not only small but also perverted. Turning everything on its head and attacking all that is good and worthy, they threaten our society at its very foundation. It is agonizingly unpleasant to deal with these convoluted brains and one would much rather purse more profitable activities, but deal with them we must. If we don't, we will surely come to grief.

Nevertheless, we need to find the time to seek the presence of those illustrious minds of which our civilization has birthed so many. Plato, Homer, Michelangelo, Bach, Shakespeare, Mozart, Beethoven, and Tolstoy are just a few in a long and distinguished line. If we only make a little effort to know them, they will fill our soul with beauty and wisdom that are not of this world.

Derided by the barbarians of the Left as 'the dead white men,' these stupendous minds will not only uplift our spirit but also wash away the liberal slime which rubs on anyone who tries to stop its purveyors from taking us down to doom.

Vasko Kohlmayer    4 10 06

In her preface  to 'The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci,' Irma A. Richter writes:

To live close to great minds is a great education, and the happiest thing that can befall us.

The reverse is also true: Dealing with small minds degrades our own. This degradation, however, is the price we must be willing to pay for our survival. It is a sad reality that our continued existence depends on our willingness to engage liberals whose minds are not only small but also perverted. Turning everything on its head and attacking all that is good and worthy, they threaten our society at its very foundation. It is agonizingly unpleasant to deal with these convoluted brains and one would much rather purse more profitable activities, but deal with them we must. If we don't, we will surely come to grief.

Nevertheless, we need to find the time to seek the presence of those illustrious minds of which our civilization has birthed so many. Plato, Homer, Michelangelo, Bach, Shakespeare, Mozart, Beethoven, and Tolstoy are just a few in a long and distinguished line. If we only make a little effort to know them, they will fill our soul with beauty and wisdom that are not of this world.

Derided by the barbarians of the Left as 'the dead white men,' these stupendous minds will not only uplift our spirit but also wash away the liberal slime which rubs on anyone who tries to stop its purveyors from taking us down to doom.

Vasko Kohlmayer    4 10 06