Journalism majors and cheating

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Journalism majors admit to cheating at a higher rate than other students. Do the cheat more? Or do they speal the bens more readily than others? 
 
Honesty endures as the best policy in life  

The Feb. 6 issue of BusinessWeek magazine reported the following findings by the Center for Academic Integrity, a think tank affiliated with the Kenan Institute for Ethics:

In a survey of nearly 50,000 students at 69 schools, 26 percent of the business majors admitted to serious cheating on exams. On written assignments, 54 percent admitted they cheated. This includes plagiarism and poaching a friend's homework.

Journalism majors were equally dishonest, 27 percent admitted they cheated on exams.

The most honest group was students in the sciences, where 19 percent reported cheating on tests. 

Ed Lasky   4 23 06 

Journalism majors admit to cheating at a higher rate than other students. Do the cheat more? Or do they speal the bens more readily than others? 
 
Honesty endures as the best policy in life  

The Feb. 6 issue of BusinessWeek magazine reported the following findings by the Center for Academic Integrity, a think tank affiliated with the Kenan Institute for Ethics:

In a survey of nearly 50,000 students at 69 schools, 26 percent of the business majors admitted to serious cheating on exams. On written assignments, 54 percent admitted they cheated. This includes plagiarism and poaching a friend's homework.

Journalism majors were equally dishonest, 27 percent admitted they cheated on exams.

The most honest group was students in the sciences, where 19 percent reported cheating on tests. 

Ed Lasky   4 23 06