Hugo Chavez condemns US on immigration

You had to see this coming. Venezuelan dictator Hugo Chavez has weighed in on the U.S. immigration debate, roundly condemning the U.S. for trying to enforce its immigration laws. Knowing a populist movement when he sees one, he came down on the side of the Mexican—flag—waving illegal immigrants shouting anti—U.S. slogans, a half a million of whom marched in the streets of Los Angeles a week ago.

The Venezuelan dictator, who's driven tens of thousands of Venezuelans into U.S. exile since he took power in 1999, called the U.S. "fascist" for its peaceful, democratic debate on border issues currently ongoing in Congress.

It's altogether amazing logic, given that his own fascistic (at minimum) militaristic state, with armed troops on every corner of Caracas, has no such peaceful debates in its now—unicameral legislature that is nothing more than a rubber—stamp parliament.

Given his propensity to meddle in U.S. political affairs, he is likelly looking to add a new political power base to his existing one in the U.S. He has already tried to make inroads with U.S. blacks through certain kinds of Katrina aid and his subsidized heating oil programs delivered through the Kennedys and Citgo. Now, he is spreading his political influence West.

How convenient that he now has his hands on the U.S. voting apparatus, too.

While America slept.

A.M. Mora y Leon 04 —1 06

 

You had to see this coming. Venezuelan dictator Hugo Chavez has weighed in on the U.S. immigration debate, roundly condemning the U.S. for trying to enforce its immigration laws. Knowing a populist movement when he sees one, he came down on the side of the Mexican—flag—waving illegal immigrants shouting anti—U.S. slogans, a half a million of whom marched in the streets of Los Angeles a week ago.

The Venezuelan dictator, who's driven tens of thousands of Venezuelans into U.S. exile since he took power in 1999, called the U.S. "fascist" for its peaceful, democratic debate on border issues currently ongoing in Congress.

It's altogether amazing logic, given that his own fascistic (at minimum) militaristic state, with armed troops on every corner of Caracas, has no such peaceful debates in its now—unicameral legislature that is nothing more than a rubber—stamp parliament.

Given his propensity to meddle in U.S. political affairs, he is likelly looking to add a new political power base to his existing one in the U.S. He has already tried to make inroads with U.S. blacks through certain kinds of Katrina aid and his subsidized heating oil programs delivered through the Kennedys and Citgo. Now, he is spreading his political influence West.

How convenient that he now has his hands on the U.S. voting apparatus, too.

While America slept.

A.M. Mora y Leon 04 —1 06