Tip-toeing around

The San Francisco Chronicle writes a front page story about the changing racial migration patterns in the United States and waits until the 18th paragraph to drop the bombshell:

The San Francisco area's black population saw the largest decline among black populations in large metropolitan areas between 2000 and 2004, dropping 6.3 percent.

Just why the San Francisco area is driving away its black population, what this mught mean for the newspapers readers, and various other questions remain completely unexplored.

The obvious answer is that housing prices are very high, and that whites are also being driven away. But could the smug liberal atmosphere in the Bay Area be repellant to blacks?

Thomas Lifson   3 07 06

The San Francisco Chronicle writes a front page story about the changing racial migration patterns in the United States and waits until the 18th paragraph to drop the bombshell:

The San Francisco area's black population saw the largest decline among black populations in large metropolitan areas between 2000 and 2004, dropping 6.3 percent.

Just why the San Francisco area is driving away its black population, what this mught mean for the newspapers readers, and various other questions remain completely unexplored.

The obvious answer is that housing prices are very high, and that whites are also being driven away. But could the smug liberal atmosphere in the Bay Area be repellant to blacks?

Thomas Lifson   3 07 06