Tapping the Eastern Europe labor pool

Once again, Islamic extremists harm their own people. As riots and sadistic attacks spread in Europe, nations are beginning to see the folly of their ways in relying on Muslims to fill their labor ranks. They have begun to shift their eyes to bringing in workers from eastern Europe. The Wall Street Journal reports (paid link):

Europe's fear of cheap labor is easing, as more countries prepare to admit workers from former Soviet bloc states.

"Three new countries have already announced that they will lift [restrictions], and others indicated pretty clearly that they will loosen the rules," European Union employment commissioner Vladimir Spidla said at a news conference Friday.

Spain, Portugal and Finland recently said that on May 1 they will revoke rules limiting the inflow of workers from countries that joined the EU in 2004. Mr. Spidla didn't name the countries that are considering easing their rules but noted that Germany and Austria are the only countries that openly have pledged to keep their labor restrictions.

Under the treaty that let Poland, Hungary and eight other countries into the EU, the union's 15 older member states were allowed to restrict labor migration for as long as seven years.

The United Kingdom, Sweden and Ireland already have let in workers from the newer EU member states. Many of these migrants have filled labor shortages in low—wage sectors of the countries' economies, which are among the best—performing in the EU.

Other countries, including France, where the unemployment rate hovers near 10%, are unlikely to open their borders ahead of schedule. France famously fears the Polish plumber —— a hypothetical EU migrant who would undercut local labor rates and put French citizens out of work.

Ed Lasky   3 13 06

Once again, Islamic extremists harm their own people. As riots and sadistic attacks spread in Europe, nations are beginning to see the folly of their ways in relying on Muslims to fill their labor ranks. They have begun to shift their eyes to bringing in workers from eastern Europe. The Wall Street Journal reports (paid link):

Europe's fear of cheap labor is easing, as more countries prepare to admit workers from former Soviet bloc states.

"Three new countries have already announced that they will lift [restrictions], and others indicated pretty clearly that they will loosen the rules," European Union employment commissioner Vladimir Spidla said at a news conference Friday.

Spain, Portugal and Finland recently said that on May 1 they will revoke rules limiting the inflow of workers from countries that joined the EU in 2004. Mr. Spidla didn't name the countries that are considering easing their rules but noted that Germany and Austria are the only countries that openly have pledged to keep their labor restrictions.

Under the treaty that let Poland, Hungary and eight other countries into the EU, the union's 15 older member states were allowed to restrict labor migration for as long as seven years.

The United Kingdom, Sweden and Ireland already have let in workers from the newer EU member states. Many of these migrants have filled labor shortages in low—wage sectors of the countries' economies, which are among the best—performing in the EU.

Other countries, including France, where the unemployment rate hovers near 10%, are unlikely to open their borders ahead of schedule. France famously fears the Polish plumber —— a hypothetical EU migrant who would undercut local labor rates and put French citizens out of work.

Ed Lasky   3 13 06