Look in the sky - it's Dubai!

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In the "Washington Outlook" section of the latest issue of Aviation Week and Space Technology, Bond, David Bond, has this to say:

If you like Dubai Ports World, the prospective buyer of the British company that operates six major U.S. ports, you'll love Dubai Aerospace Enterprise, the holding company being established to provide, among other things, aircraft leasing, airport development and management and MRO [Maintenance, Repair and Overhaul] services (see page 30). At $15 billion, part of it from the government of Dubai, the company will be capitalized for a robust startup and early competitiveness in worldwide markets. And, to the extent that its planned activities draw interest from potential customers in the U.S., it will provoke howls on Capitol Hill from people who are appalled that the Bush administration would "turn over our ports" to a country accused of condoning and helping finance terror. The aerospace unit also will face established interests, prominently labor, that oppose outsourcing of any sort and consider overseas MRO work to be a security problem.

That'll be fun to watch when it hits the Senatorial fan.

On page 30 you learn that in the not too distant future the aircraft your flying in may be owned by Dubai, sorry, Dubai Aerospace Enterprise:

The company expects to become the world's third—largest aircraft leasing company behind International Lease Finance Corp. (ILFC) and General Electric Capital Aviation Services (Gecas) in the wide—body market. While al—Zarouni was not prepared to unveil the exact timing and size of orders, industry officials say initial large orders with both Airbus and Boeing could come this year.

Not only that, but they even may have participated in the manufacture of the plane in which you are so comfortably ensconced:

For DAE, aircraft final assembly is not on the short—term agenda, but it does aim to start manufacturing airframe and engine parts soon, although the company did not reveal many details about the business plan. Nonetheless, the announcement means that Airbus and Boeing may have to reconsider their supply chain efforts to include the Dubai venture so that they are well—positioned for future orders of state—owned airlines in the region.

And may have also built the airport your landing at if your going to India or China:

But DAE also seeks to participate in construction, upgrades and management of airports in India and China particularly. Al—Zarouni says initial discussions are ongoing, but he declines to give further details. "We want to be like [airport groups] Aeroports de Paris (ADP) and BAA, but hopefully we will be bigger and better."

If this doesn't appeal to you, then petition your Representative to get America cracking on the liquefaction of its coal and the conversion of Canadian oil sands to replace all that crude oil we now import.

And do keep in mind that this doesn't at all consider the vast quantities of American assets that 'our friends' the Saudis already own and are continuing to buy.

Cheers. Nothing like a good dose of xenophobia to stimulate the senses.

Dennis Sevakis   3 1 06

In the "Washington Outlook" section of the latest issue of Aviation Week and Space Technology, Bond, David Bond, has this to say:

If you like Dubai Ports World, the prospective buyer of the British company that operates six major U.S. ports, you'll love Dubai Aerospace Enterprise, the holding company being established to provide, among other things, aircraft leasing, airport development and management and MRO [Maintenance, Repair and Overhaul] services (see page 30). At $15 billion, part of it from the government of Dubai, the company will be capitalized for a robust startup and early competitiveness in worldwide markets. And, to the extent that its planned activities draw interest from potential customers in the U.S., it will provoke howls on Capitol Hill from people who are appalled that the Bush administration would "turn over our ports" to a country accused of condoning and helping finance terror. The aerospace unit also will face established interests, prominently labor, that oppose outsourcing of any sort and consider overseas MRO work to be a security problem.

That'll be fun to watch when it hits the Senatorial fan.

On page 30 you learn that in the not too distant future the aircraft your flying in may be owned by Dubai, sorry, Dubai Aerospace Enterprise:

The company expects to become the world's third—largest aircraft leasing company behind International Lease Finance Corp. (ILFC) and General Electric Capital Aviation Services (Gecas) in the wide—body market. While al—Zarouni was not prepared to unveil the exact timing and size of orders, industry officials say initial large orders with both Airbus and Boeing could come this year.

Not only that, but they even may have participated in the manufacture of the plane in which you are so comfortably ensconced:

For DAE, aircraft final assembly is not on the short—term agenda, but it does aim to start manufacturing airframe and engine parts soon, although the company did not reveal many details about the business plan. Nonetheless, the announcement means that Airbus and Boeing may have to reconsider their supply chain efforts to include the Dubai venture so that they are well—positioned for future orders of state—owned airlines in the region.

And may have also built the airport your landing at if your going to India or China:

But DAE also seeks to participate in construction, upgrades and management of airports in India and China particularly. Al—Zarouni says initial discussions are ongoing, but he declines to give further details. "We want to be like [airport groups] Aeroports de Paris (ADP) and BAA, but hopefully we will be bigger and better."

If this doesn't appeal to you, then petition your Representative to get America cracking on the liquefaction of its coal and the conversion of Canadian oil sands to replace all that crude oil we now import.

And do keep in mind that this doesn't at all consider the vast quantities of American assets that 'our friends' the Saudis already own and are continuing to buy.

Cheers. Nothing like a good dose of xenophobia to stimulate the senses.

Dennis Sevakis   3 1 06