A huge grain of salt

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I would take this article (linked to by Thomas Lifson today) with a HUGE grain of salt.  At least until there's some additional supporting data.  I read the same article and would like to note that the author himself admits that there's no "iron clad" evidence of it's existence.  I'm skeptical because a program of this magnitude would require the participation of literally thousands of people, and would impact the lives of 10's of thousands. It's hard to believe that something affecting so many people could be kept secret.

If there is any truth to this, it likely involves a much more modest system.  For example, there was a missile system developed for the F15 to allow that aircraft to intercept low level satellites.  Iterating this system to put a micro sat (less then 100 lbs) into orbit might be possible.  While a satellite of that size couldn't provide anything like the resolution of a standard reconnaissance satellite, it's flexibility and low cost would make it a valuable battlefield aid.  This micro sat could also be used for electronic surveillance or a communications node.   The important point is that this sort of system would involve fewer people and resources and would be much easier to hide within the massive budgets of the DOD.

The main reason I tend to be skeptical is because I want this article to be true.  I want the United States to have the capability to develop this kind of system in complete secrecy and I want us to have this system.   Over the years, and after so many disappointments, I've learned to be skeptical and cautious of claims about the United States be able to create wonder aircraft.  The last one that truly stunned the world was the SR—71.  Today I doubt that any such program could be developed and deployed with such secrecy.

But I could be wrong....

Steven W. Dugger   3 07 06

I would take this article (linked to by Thomas Lifson today) with a HUGE grain of salt.  At least until there's some additional supporting data.  I read the same article and would like to note that the author himself admits that there's no "iron clad" evidence of it's existence.  I'm skeptical because a program of this magnitude would require the participation of literally thousands of people, and would impact the lives of 10's of thousands. It's hard to believe that something affecting so many people could be kept secret.

If there is any truth to this, it likely involves a much more modest system.  For example, there was a missile system developed for the F15 to allow that aircraft to intercept low level satellites.  Iterating this system to put a micro sat (less then 100 lbs) into orbit might be possible.  While a satellite of that size couldn't provide anything like the resolution of a standard reconnaissance satellite, it's flexibility and low cost would make it a valuable battlefield aid.  This micro sat could also be used for electronic surveillance or a communications node.   The important point is that this sort of system would involve fewer people and resources and would be much easier to hide within the massive budgets of the DOD.

The main reason I tend to be skeptical is because I want this article to be true.  I want the United States to have the capability to develop this kind of system in complete secrecy and I want us to have this system.   Over the years, and after so many disappointments, I've learned to be skeptical and cautious of claims about the United States be able to create wonder aircraft.  The last one that truly stunned the world was the SR—71.  Today I doubt that any such program could be developed and deployed with such secrecy.

But I could be wrong....

Steven W. Dugger   3 07 06