What NYT Elitists Think of You

By

The New York Times' elitist management and editors make no secret of their disdain for ordinary Americans, as they open today's lead editorial with this comment:

The illegal immigrants who trim our hedges, prepare our food and care for our children have been compared to an invading army. If so, they have descended on a land desperate for occupation. This is a nation that insists on paying as little as possible for goods and services, and as long as it remains impractical to send lawns, motel beds and dirty dishes overseas, determined immigrants and semiporous borders will continue to feed the American addiction to cheap labor.

This view of Americans as a bunch of skinflint slave drivers is belied by the reality of hordes of illegal immigrants who risk life and limb to get here and earn those free market wages which are far higher than what's available in their native lands.
 
The perhaps inadvertently exposed disdain in which Times holds ordinary citizens goes a long way toward explaining as well the apparent NY Times view that we are also all too dumb to digest and understand news reports unless they've been filtered, cherry—picked, analyzed, and appropriately slanted before making their way into news columns that once were —— at least purportedly —— objective and fair.
 
Richard N. Weltz   2 25 06

Thomas Lifson adds:

I see the Times attacking the principles of a market economy here. They make rational economic behavior into a cruel sin of he who "insists on paying as little as possible for goods and services."

I detect the odor of a preference to have wise intellectuals or central planners set the price levels. In disparaging the urge to find the market price, the Times disparages capitalism. As Dick points out, both sides are happy with the bargain.

The New York Times' elitist management and editors make no secret of their disdain for ordinary Americans, as they open today's lead editorial with this comment:

The illegal immigrants who trim our hedges, prepare our food and care for our children have been compared to an invading army. If so, they have descended on a land desperate for occupation. This is a nation that insists on paying as little as possible for goods and services, and as long as it remains impractical to send lawns, motel beds and dirty dishes overseas, determined immigrants and semiporous borders will continue to feed the American addiction to cheap labor.

This view of Americans as a bunch of skinflint slave drivers is belied by the reality of hordes of illegal immigrants who risk life and limb to get here and earn those free market wages which are far higher than what's available in their native lands.
 
The perhaps inadvertently exposed disdain in which Times holds ordinary citizens goes a long way toward explaining as well the apparent NY Times view that we are also all too dumb to digest and understand news reports unless they've been filtered, cherry—picked, analyzed, and appropriately slanted before making their way into news columns that once were —— at least purportedly —— objective and fair.
 
Richard N. Weltz   2 25 06

Thomas Lifson adds:

I see the Times attacking the principles of a market economy here. They make rational economic behavior into a cruel sin of he who "insists on paying as little as possible for goods and services."

I detect the odor of a preference to have wise intellectuals or central planners set the price levels. In disparaging the urge to find the market price, the Times disparages capitalism. As Dick points out, both sides are happy with the bargain.