University rioting

By

As Americans watch, mainly in shock, at the lethal rioting in the Muslim world over the publication of a few cartoons, spurring debate about free speech and free press, perhaps we could teach our Muslim brethren how the United States deals with such issues.

In the rarified atmosphere of our elite universities, which often serve as a model for our country, the solution to dealing with disagreeable opinions is to castigate and publicly humiliate and perhaps fire the miscreant individuals who err.  "Ah," some might protest, "but universities are supposed to be open to the pursuit of knowledge wherever it may lead."  The reality is harsher; universities talk about open mindedness meaning it must fit the liberal, left truths.  Deviate or question these truth by bringing in an alternative perspective and the universities' minds snap shut.

Recall the uproar nearly a year ago when Harvard university's president dared to publicly speculate that the lack of women in the upper echelons of science might be because of their aptitudes and interests.  One woman was so upset that, some would say in a most ladylike manner, she became ill and almost rushed from the room.  As a result of upsetting this woman, and several others, 

Harvard University's governing board is considering whether to intervene before the Ivy League school's president faces an unprecedented second vote of no confidence over his leadership, three newspapers reported this weekend.

...The university's faculty of arts and sciences has scheduled a no—confidence vote for its February 28 meeting, almost one year after the body approved a no—confidence measure in March, 2005 after Summers' comments on women sparked controversy.

Summers, a former U.S. Treasury secretary who has lead America's oldest college since 2001, said women's "intrinsic aptitude" might explain why so few women work in the academic sciences. He has apologized for those remarks many times.

Under pressure, Galileo also publicly apologized for saying the earth revolved around the sun which went against the truths of the time.  Galileo was proven correct; hopefully embattled rights of free speech and free press will eventually overwhelm the mobs in the streets and universities today.

Ethel C. Fenig   2 20 06

As Americans watch, mainly in shock, at the lethal rioting in the Muslim world over the publication of a few cartoons, spurring debate about free speech and free press, perhaps we could teach our Muslim brethren how the United States deals with such issues.

In the rarified atmosphere of our elite universities, which often serve as a model for our country, the solution to dealing with disagreeable opinions is to castigate and publicly humiliate and perhaps fire the miscreant individuals who err.  "Ah," some might protest, "but universities are supposed to be open to the pursuit of knowledge wherever it may lead."  The reality is harsher; universities talk about open mindedness meaning it must fit the liberal, left truths.  Deviate or question these truth by bringing in an alternative perspective and the universities' minds snap shut.

Recall the uproar nearly a year ago when Harvard university's president dared to publicly speculate that the lack of women in the upper echelons of science might be because of their aptitudes and interests.  One woman was so upset that, some would say in a most ladylike manner, she became ill and almost rushed from the room.  As a result of upsetting this woman, and several others, 

Harvard University's governing board is considering whether to intervene before the Ivy League school's president faces an unprecedented second vote of no confidence over his leadership, three newspapers reported this weekend.

...The university's faculty of arts and sciences has scheduled a no—confidence vote for its February 28 meeting, almost one year after the body approved a no—confidence measure in March, 2005 after Summers' comments on women sparked controversy.

Summers, a former U.S. Treasury secretary who has lead America's oldest college since 2001, said women's "intrinsic aptitude" might explain why so few women work in the academic sciences. He has apologized for those remarks many times.

Under pressure, Galileo also publicly apologized for saying the earth revolved around the sun which went against the truths of the time.  Galileo was proven correct; hopefully embattled rights of free speech and free press will eventually overwhelm the mobs in the streets and universities today.

Ethel C. Fenig   2 20 06