The lonely truthteller from Dreamworks

By

That is Leon Wieseltier's scornful label for Steven Spielberg.

Wieseltier administers as savage verbal thrashing to Spielberg, for his self—pitying response to criticism of his mega—flop Munich. In order to read the article you must register with The New Republic, but it is free and easy. I highly recommend doing so, especially if sarcasm directed at a big fat target appeals to you. Here are a couple of samples. Read the whole thing.

He wants the glamour of seriousness without the responsibility of seriousness. People should not engage the perplexities of morality and history if they are prepared only to be loved. [snip]

... I wonder whether he even knows what he is talking about. "We were accused of the sin of moral equivocation," he says. No, he was accused——rightly or wrongly——of the sin of moral equivalence. That is not the same thing. Moral equivalence is the antithesis of moral equivocation. And Spielberg sorrowfully denounces "the Luddite position people take any time the Middle East is up for discussion." He seems not to know what Luddism means. The Israeli—Palestinian conflict is disfigured by many varieties of ugly reaction, but the hatred of technology is not prominent among them.

Thomas Lifson   2 03 06

That is Leon Wieseltier's scornful label for Steven Spielberg.

Wieseltier administers as savage verbal thrashing to Spielberg, for his self—pitying response to criticism of his mega—flop Munich. In order to read the article you must register with The New Republic, but it is free and easy. I highly recommend doing so, especially if sarcasm directed at a big fat target appeals to you. Here are a couple of samples. Read the whole thing.

He wants the glamour of seriousness without the responsibility of seriousness. People should not engage the perplexities of morality and history if they are prepared only to be loved. [snip]

... I wonder whether he even knows what he is talking about. "We were accused of the sin of moral equivocation," he says. No, he was accused——rightly or wrongly——of the sin of moral equivalence. That is not the same thing. Moral equivalence is the antithesis of moral equivocation. And Spielberg sorrowfully denounces "the Luddite position people take any time the Middle East is up for discussion." He seems not to know what Luddism means. The Israeli—Palestinian conflict is disfigured by many varieties of ugly reaction, but the hatred of technology is not prominent among them.

Thomas Lifson   2 03 06